Find the Job - Job Search News

When You Look in the Mirror, I Smile

Career-Line - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 17:00

Find out how a simple mirror can improve your likelihood of landing the job.

This article When You Look in the Mirror, I Smile appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

New Occupations to Be Part of U.S. Jobs List

WSJ Careers - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 14:46
In 2018, the Bureau of Labor Statistics will begin using an updated set of job titles to track the U.S. workforce.

GE Finds Employee Ratings Unsatisfactory

WSJ Careers - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 10:21
The industrial giant is latest to join the ranks of companies that are overhauling their performance-review system. Evidence suggests that boiling a year of performance down to a single category does more harm than good for many employees.

Meet the Verizon Executive Behind the Yahoo Deal

WSJ Careers - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 10:19
Two years ago, the CEO of Verizon Communications handed a rising lieutenant a big job: build three business units that can each generate $5 billion of revenue a year. That executive is Marni Walden.

Tackling Workers' Mental Health, One Text at a Time

WSJ Careers - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 09:20
As employers seek to reduce the costs of untreated mental illness among staffers, they are turning to mobile apps that can help workers find and receive treatment on their smartphones.

LinkedIn Skills You Didn't Think You Needed: 'Round Tables,' 'Hugs,' 'Cheese'

WSJ Careers - Mon, 07/25/2016 - 21:07
Pranksters offer questionable endorsements for online profiles of friends and colleagues from a menu of 35,000 skills that includes ‘tapping’ and ‘crystal ball.’

10 Ways To Ask For Job Help

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 07/25/2016 - 10:06

It’s never easy to ask for help. You want to believe you can do it on your own. Asking for help sometimes implies weakness or defeat. When you ask for help you don’t want to feel like you need the help-like there is something lacking in your ability to help yourself. It’s no different when you ask for help with your job search. It doesn’t matter if you are a big shot in your profession or are looking for any entry-level position. Asking for help takes courage, strength, dignity and a whole lot of common sense. D you know when is the right time to ask for help? Do you know if it’s appropriate to ask for help from anyone or just those you feel comfortable with?

Asking for help may not come easy for you but knowing how and when to express the need is not only crucial but beneficial when you want it the most. Asking for help is not a crime and should not be perceived that way. When you finally reach out and ask for help it signals that you are open and willing to accept a hand in whatever form it shows up. Next time you find yourself in a position to ask for help here are some things you might consider:

1-Make sure you feel comfortable with the concept of asking for help BEFORE you reach out to your friends and professional network. Doing something that feels unnatural or uncomfortable will sound like begging and not a request for assistance.

2-Know what kind of help to ask for and from whom is important piece in figuring out how reasonable your request for assistance is and who might be in a position to offer you support.

3-Never solely rely on a friendship or family status to help you get a job or a connection for help with a job. Lead with your skills and talents.

4-Offer to take someone to dinner or lunch to help you “pick their brain” and have them pick up the tab instead.

5-Ask for help not just for yourself but also for a friend, spouse, child, and niece.

6-Put someone in an awkward position by asking for unsolicited feedback on how well you interview, or your character, or if they are able to find you a job.

7-Reconnecting with someone you have not spoken to just for the sole purpose of asking for help with a job search or negotiate a job offer.

8-Stalking someone on social media or LinkedIn for the sole purpose of connecting with them to help you find a job without context or a good reason.

9-Asking for references from someone you have not heard from in awhile just because you may need them in the future whether you have a new job offer or not.

10-Connecting with someone you don’t know on LinkedIn to ask for help connecting to a job or company because you work there even though you don’t know that person.

Asking for job assistance is not a bad thing or at least it shouldn’t be. Knowing how to leverage your network of friends and contacts is an art form that takes time and practice. There is a social skill you need to know how to ask for help in a way that does not offend. Some people have it others do not. Finding what works for you and making sure you are both courteous, respectful and kind is part of the etiquette required when asking anyone for help no matter what the situation.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

 

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: 10 Ways To Ask For Job Help

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

A Teaching Stint in Japan Helps a CEO Close a Deal

WSJ Careers - Thu, 07/21/2016 - 13:28
Chieh Huang, co-founder and CEO of online shopping site Boxed Wholesale, got a job teaching English in Japan as his first job out of college. The experience helped him years later when he was learning to navigate the venture capital world.

Folks Who are Thinking of Hiring Someone Like You

Career-Line - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 16:45

We name the best employers and recruiters in the country each season, so we’d like to congratulate the “Top Recruitment Professionals in America” for Summer 2016.

This article Folks Who are Thinking of Hiring Someone Like You appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

Roughly Half of Workers Are Satisfied on the Job

WSJ Careers - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 11:08
Just under half of U.S. workers said they felt satisfied with their jobs last year—the happiest they’ve been in a decade, according to a new report from the Conference Board, a research group.

Starbucks Widens Workers' Health-Insurance Options

WSJ Careers - Mon, 07/18/2016 - 21:05
Starbucks said it would be offering employees new health-insurance choices as part of an effort to make the coffee chain a more attractive employer.

When Being Transparent Isn’t Always Clear…

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 07/18/2016 - 11:03

You may pride yourself on such admirable qualities as, honesty, directness, integrity and the willingness to be open and transparent in your dealings with others that would make any prospective employer stand up and take notice. But when the view you have of yourself differs from how others perceive you, the disconnect can often have dire consequences. Being self-aware is an important attribute no matter what the situation but it’s never more important when you put yourself out there for a new job, a promotion or career opportunity.

You may have a charming and disarming demeanor with the ability to light up the room with a wink and a smile. Those traits may get you far on the social scene but knowing how and when to turn on the charm in a professional setting is equally as important. You may have a new boss, recently changed jobs or are in the process of accepting a job offer when you decide that it’s best to “tell all” in an attempt to either bond, connect or be “transparent.” Knowing your audience is the first rule in understanding when to offer too much information. You might think sharing your intimate thoughts, desires, likes and dislikes is a way to become close to someone, a way to relate, to connect on a deeper level. But when your “transparency leaves someone dazed and confused and in some cases offended by your lack of judgment and respect, you might scratch your head and wonder, “How did I misread that one?”

It might be hard sometimes to know what is appropriate when you think you are being affable and open particularly in a new professional relationship. By not understanding the boundaries, you can be perceived as inappropriate and lacking in judgment and or common sense. Knowing that every step you make leading up to and accepting a job offer is carefully scrutinized even before they start the reference checking process.

So when you think you are being transparent, check a few things before you move full speed ahead and pull the curtain back to reveal all.

  1. Don’t jump the hierarchy chain of command when you are not getting your answers met, ask what the appropriate steps are for resolving any disputes before deciding to take matters into your own hands.
  2. Avoid sending smiley faces, funny gifs and emoticons to show how you really “feel” trust me, they will get it without the elaborate icons.
  3. Try not to mix business with pleasure when you are having a relaxed conversation about the weekend and decide to discuss an increase in pay, title, benefits that suddenly turns your cocktail party into a hostage negotiation.
  4. Don’t make the mistake of assuming your new, soon-to-be boss is your best friend and in an effort to be “open” discuss things that are best left for your mother or your therapist.
  5. Knowing when “no” means “no” in any point of a professional relationship and understanding when it’s appropriate to push back and when it is not.
  6. Divulging more about your personal health, social or economic status to a prospective employer is not appropriate even if you have the promotion or job offer in hand.
  7. Cutting people out who are your allies and have been part of the decision making process because you somehow feel it makes better sense to be “transparent” on your own without any help or adult supervision.
  8. Not understanding the appropriateness of knowing when to keep your mouth shut and knowing when to push forward in an attempt to be heard or get what you want.
  9. Understanding that just because you feel “comfortable” in your dealings with someone does not mean you can step over the line and ask for something that is unreasonable or where you have already been told, “no.”
  10. Having enough common sense to know when to manage expectations, apologize when you overstep the boundary and offer up more than is needed or wanted and to know when enough is really enough.

Most people only have one shot at getting it right when it comes to a work situation. Some people are lucky and get a second chance. Being smart enough not to blow up an opportunity when you have a lot riding on it and to know when to read the signs will get you far in life. Just because you pride yourself on being “transparent” does not mean that it’s clear how and when to move forward. You have to develop better vision than being transparent if you want to be truly clear on how to move forward in your career.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: When Being Transparent Isn’t Always Clear…

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

I Had a Bad Day

Career-Line - Tue, 07/12/2016 - 09:00

Here’s how to bounce back from a bad day on the job hunt.

This article I Had a Bad Day appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

5 Things To Piss Off A Recruiter

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 10:57

When it comes to making a good first impression do you tend to “over compensate” and push too hard? Listen it’s hard to know how you should behave to a total stranger especially one who has the power to get you your next job. Knowing how to act and knowing what drives recruiters crazy is the first step to not making it your last step when you show up for an interview.

Next time you find yourself in front of a perfect stranger who has your career in the palm of their hands here are a few things to avoid if you want them to ever call you back:

  1. Fidget & Fuss: We all get nervous especially on an interview for a job you really want. But acting like you can’t hold it together is not going to score any real points with the recruiter. Shifting in your chair, biting your nails, playing with your hair or an object, chewing gum are all signs that you are not able to act and behave professionally when under pressure. You are being judged for your professionalism as well as your skills so remember when interviewing for the part you better learn how to act the part first.
  2. Sweaty Hands: Some people just naturally sweat and some people take it to an art form especially when they are nervous. No one likes to shake a wet towel and then have to wipe their hands off on their clothes afterwards. If you are one of those that have to wring your hands (and feet) from sweaty glands, you can try a little trick before you are introduced to a recruiter. Try carrying small can of deodorant spray or wipes in your pocket and gingerly apply a small amount to your hands. Avoid using powder or dry deodorant as they leave a sticky feeling and white residue that will likely get all over the recruiter’s hands. Alcohol wipes or Purell also act as a drying agent if you have room to carry them. Remember dry before you apply.
  3. “You Think I’ll Get The Job?” Asking the recruiter about your chances before you even get through the first interview shows you are too eager and maybe just a little desperate – no one wants to be harassed! You may want to know about your chances and how well you stack up against the other candidates but best to save that for a follow up email or the next round of interviews assuming you get a call back. Don’t be too pushy or forceful please learn to play it cool.
  4. “Do You Have Any Questions? When asked if you have any questions either about the job or the company, don’t sit there with a blank stare or simply state, “Nope, I got it!” The recruiter does not want to be the only one talking and asking questions and it’s good to show you did your homework before you came in for an interview. Being prepared with a few questions, even if they are general ones, shows that you have given the process some thought and that you are interested in the company and knowledgeable about its products and services. Staring down the recruiter should not be your only response.
  5. “How much?” We all want to be paid fairly for work but putting the recruiter on the spot about salary and compensation in a first meeting may not be the right approach. If you are asked about your compensation requirements be honest and tell them what you are currently making or, that you did some research and would like a salary between a specific range. It’s best if you do not initiate conversation about salary unless asked on a first meeting or you will likely put the recruiter on the spot as they sometimes are not fully aware of the budget or range. Trust me, if they like you, they will make the compensation work for you-wait until you are asked.

Making sure you make the best first impression means you are aware of how you come across in making the interviewer feel comfortable and relaxed. That doesn’t mean you should pull out pictures of your family vacation, but learning to read the queues and keeping it professional will ensure you at least a follow up interview if not a job offer.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: 5 Things To Piss Off A Recruiter

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

Ladders’ Top 200 Recruiters: Q2 2016

Career-Line - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 09:00

Ladders reveals its most influential recruiters of Q2 2016.

This article Ladders’ Top 200 Recruiters: Q2 2016 appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

Giving Minority Students a Career Boost Before B-School

WSJ Careers - Fri, 07/08/2016 - 07:47
Business schools have long been pushing to enroll more students from underrepresented minorities. Now, a slate of pre-M.B.A. programs are making sure those students arrive on campus with strong networks and career know-how.

New Growth Plan for Online Lenders: Layoffs

WSJ Careers - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 21:56
The first half of 2016 has been a surprising reality check for once-highflying online lenders, touted by some as the future of banking.

At 94 Years Old, a Fund Manager Finds Himself Back on Top

WSJ Careers - Tue, 07/05/2016 - 23:15
Irving Levine and his Copley Fund take first place in the quarterly Winners’ Circle contest.

CEOs Use Small Changes as Wedge for Makeover

WSJ Careers - Tue, 07/05/2016 - 22:00
New CEOs who are outsiders sometimes use small changes to steer a company toward a broad corporate transformation.

Meet the Man Behind Wimbledon's Strawberries

WSJ Careers - Tue, 07/05/2016 - 19:21
Anthony Davies, head of catering at this year’s Wimbledon, thinks in terms of hospitality strategy and keeps count of the fresh berries that go in to the event’s signature strawberries and cream snack.

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