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An Auto Engineer Returns to Work After 24 Years Raising Children

WSJ Careers - Wed, 05/04/2016 - 13:31
Technology has changed since Wendy MacLennan left to raise her four children; her new job at Ford at first was ‘like being dropped off in a land where you don’t speak the language.’

Forget Mental-Health Days, 'Me Time' Comes to the Office

WSJ Careers - Wed, 05/04/2016 - 13:23
A handful of companies have begun offering workers paid “me time” to devote to themselves, in addition to regular vacation time and personal and sick days.

Videogamers Wanted...to Help With Medical Research

WSJ Careers - Wed, 05/04/2016 - 10:19
Scientists are recruiting thousands of videogamers to develop a better test for tuberculosis, the latest in a cascade of crowdsourcing research efforts that analyze proteins, test tumors and investigate genetic diseases.

Silicon Valley Female Leaders Launch Tool to Improve Diversity

WSJ Careers - Wed, 05/04/2016 - 07:43
A group of influential women in the tech industry on Tuesday launched a tool to better measure and increase diversity in technology, an area where they say not enough progress has been made.

Air France Enforces 2012 Cost-Cutting Plan for Pilots

WSJ Careers - Tue, 05/03/2016 - 16:07
Air France has decided to enforce a cost-cutting plan for its pilots that was originally announced in 2012 but delayed by opposition from unions. The measures will result in lower pay per hour spent flying.

Retiring After 65 May Help People Live Longer

WSJ Careers - Mon, 05/02/2016 - 17:42
A study found that retiring after age 65 may help people live longer, with further longevity benefits for leaving work between 66 and 72.

Graduating? Here’s 5 Ways To Ace Your Job Interview…

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 05/02/2016 - 09:41

Getting ready to graduate? Wondering when the job offer will come? Worried you did too much post graduation partying? How you get yourself ready for your next big career move is no laughing matter! You may have been valedictorian but do you have what it takes to ace your first job interview? You may walk into the interview cocky and sure of yourself and you may wonder why you even need to interview for the job in the first place? You may not be as good as you think! It’s great to possess self-confidence and to be self-assured when you are out in front, but how do you really know you are acing the interview or living up to a higher standard?

Here are five ways to know you are hitting it out of the park whether you ultimately get a job offer or not:

  • Body Language: It’s always good to know your audience but do you know how to read them as well? Sizing up someone’s body language is key in knowing whether you are engaging or enraging your prospective boss. Does the interviewer seem relaxed, leaning back in his/her chair, feet up, remaining attentive?   Or, is the person sitting across the desk, fidgeting, staring at the clock or looking outside a window, nervously tapping their feet looking like they want to fly out of the room at any given moment? Knowing whether you are setting a relaxing and calm tone in your meeting tells you this is someone who not only likes you but also doesn’t mind spending time speaking with you. This is a good sign so take it for all it is worth.
  • Meet & Greet: When they start rolling out the red carpet or ask you back to meet the “family” it’s a good sign that you’ve done something to impress them in the first place. Not everyone gets to meet prospective co-workers or future staff members even on an initial interview. If they happen to say, “Hey let me see if so and so is around as I’d love for you to meet him/her,” you know you’ve done or said something that makes the interviewer think you’d be a “good fit” for the company.
  • Checking Your Availability: Kind of like a first date, when they ask you for your number or availability over the course of the following days, weeks ahead, it’s usually a pretty good indication that they want you to be around for future follow-up meetings. Knowing your schedule ahead of time can help you plan for an upcoming meeting while you have their attention and sends the message that you are interested in coming back for more meetings as well.
  • Le Grand Tour: It’s always nice to have in person meetings with folks but when the interviewer offers you a “tour” of their campus or offices, it’s a good sign they are seeing how well you’d “fit in”. Giving you a tour is a way to boast and sell other perks the company has to offer, but it also gives the interviewer a chance to uncover other information about, your work environment and preferences in a relaxed setting. Giving you the grand tour helps them visualize you in the physical setting as much as it is determining you as a cultural fit.
  • When Will We Meet Again? When you are given a follow up appointment and are ENCOURAGED to call or write in the meantime with any follow-up questions or concerns, it’s a pretty good sign that they like you enough to want you back and to keep the lines of communication open. If they know you are interviewing elsewhere and have asked you to keep them informed on your status, that’s also a good way to know they are interested in you and may not want to lose you to the competition.

Understanding and learning how to read the subtle queues in gestures, communication and body language helps you know whether you are acing the interview or disgracing yourself in the process. If they like you and want you, they will call back, it’s that simple.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: Graduating? Here’s 5 Ways To Ace Your Job Interview…

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

Laid-Off Oil Workers Struggle to Pay Loans, Credit Cards

WSJ Careers - Wed, 04/27/2016 - 20:17
Rising unemployment in the energy sector is pushing up loan delinquencies and raising the risk of new losses for banks.

Full-Time Hires Buck the Trend at Fast-Food, Retail Chains

WSJ Careers - Wed, 04/27/2016 - 09:44
Some fast-food and retail chains are hiring more full-time workers, saying the shift has resulted in better customer service, lower turnover and a more engaged workforce.

Medical Schools Feel Squeeze in Finding Clerkships

WSJ Careers - Tue, 04/26/2016 - 20:50
New York medical schools and their competitors offshore are clashing over a precious resource: the opportunity for students to watch and learn from doctors in hospitals.

Job Outlook Brightens for New College Graduates

WSJ Careers - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 11:54
Good news for the class of 2016: Companies are planning to step up their hiring of new grads. Employers expect to hire 5.2% more freshly minted grads this year than in 2015.

Your Job-Selfie…

Lisa Kaye - Sun, 04/24/2016 - 10:50

When was the last time you took a “job-selfie”? You may spend most of your time focusing on what happens during the interview process, but are you prepared for what happens when the offer finally comes? Taking inventory of who you are is one thing, but do you know how the world sees you? Focusing on your resume, the interview and how much money you will accept are all important parts of the job process but when it comes to checking out your references, your online profile and any information out there that could be potentially damaging or misleading-just how good a sleuth are you?

Your job search comes in many forms but focusing on your profile means you are clear that nothing negative will come up during your background or reference check process. An employer will likely wait to extend an offer or make the offer conditional until all areas of your background are fully vetted. Here are a few items you should look into before someone extends you a job offer:

  1. Google Yourself: What comes up? Are there images, posts or articles about you that you wish were not there? Did you know about them or are you in shock? Whether your online-selfie reads like a who’s who, or you are cringing at some photos you see online, heading off this type of damaging information to a prospective employer BEFORE they find out about it is a wise move especially if you are serious about accepting the job offer when it comes.
  2. Social Media: Are you “friending” people you interview with? Are you part of a photo tagging frenzy? Before you decide to broaden your friendships by adding prospective employers to your list-think again. Making sure your photos, posts and images whether on FB, Instagram or Pinterest are “safe for work” is a smart idea if you again think no one is watching. Hiding items that might not show you in the most favorable light is a smart way to clean up your online profile before a nosey recruiter starts snooping around.
  3. References: Who are these people that you think will say a kind word or two about you? When was the last time you reached out to touch base? How well do you know these people and do you really know what they will say about you when asked? Knowing what your references think about you ahead of time and what they might say about you when asked, is critical if you are going to amass a group of supporters who will help you land your next job. Just because the list is impressive does not mean they even remember you or would have a good word to say about you. Asking your references if they are willing to support you in your job search should be done before you provide their name and contact to a prospective employer. Pick your friends carefully but be selective about who your references include
  4. Credit Scores: Not only do you have to worry about whether a bank or financial establishment thinks you are a safe bet, you better believe your prospective new employer might feel the same way as well. When it comes to your credit history and how well you look on paper, make sure everything is in order. Run periodic free credit checks and make sure nothing shows up that shouldn’t. Checking to make sure your social security and name match is accurate and that you are not being confused with a person in prison might be wise if you don’t want anything to stand in the way of a job offer.
  5. Drug Tests: Unless you have a history of partying hard before a pre-employment drug test, it might be wise to make sure you are on your best behavior before someone hands you a plastic container. Understanding your legal rights about pre-employment testing differs from each state so make sure you know your rights before heading into the screening center.

Your job-selfie is not just a way to get ready for your security photo but is a way for you to understand fully what is expected of you when and if you are made a job offer. Doing a bit of housekeeping in preparation for your next job is not only smart but also necessary if you do not want anything to stand in the way of you and your next job offer.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: Your Job-Selfie…

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

As Oil Jobs Dry Up, Workers Turn to Solar Sector

WSJ Careers - Fri, 04/22/2016 - 14:25
Plunging oil and gas prices have generated more than 84,000 pink slips in Texas. But many rig hands, roustabouts and pipe fitters are finding a surprising alternative in utility-scale solar farms.

Regulators Propose New Rules Curbing Pay on Wall Street

WSJ Careers - Fri, 04/22/2016 - 14:01
U.S. regulators suggested requiring the nation’s largest banks to hold back executives’ bonus pay for four years, extending by a year the common industry practice on Wall Street incentive payouts.

Home Credit Unions Dodge Rule Requiring Office Space

WSJ Careers - Fri, 04/22/2016 - 07:14
Until recently, home-based credit unions were under threat. The National Credit Union Administration in late 2013 proposed a rule that would have required all of its members to operate out of commercial locations.

Tencent, Alibaba Battle for Chinese Office App Users

WSJ Careers - Wed, 04/20/2016 - 23:47
The war to control office communications in China began in earnest Monday, writes Li Yuan, when Tencent launched its Qiye Weixin, or Enterprise WeChat, app. The new app aims to repel a threat from Alibaba.

Expat Oil Workers Fall on Hard Times

WSJ Careers - Wed, 04/20/2016 - 20:51
Amid the energy industry’s deepest retrenchment in two decades, some oil and gas workers who followed the boom in search of better opportunities are finding themselves jobless and far from home.

How to Survive Office Competition

WSJ Careers - Wed, 04/20/2016 - 16:36
Hypercompetitors spark strong reactions in colleagues, from fighting back to shutting down. Are you a worrier or a warrior?

New York's Best Sommelier Hails From Philly

WSJ Careers - Tue, 04/19/2016 - 23:22
Uncorking the City’s Lettie Teague attended a competition to find New York’s best sommelier. The winner? A wine director from Philadelphia.

My First Job-What I Need to Know …

Lisa Kaye - Tue, 04/19/2016 - 10:15

Prom night, party rentals, invitations, commencement speeches, long walk to the podium, framing your diploma, parties again, hot summer fun with friends and then…? You are not what your parents made at least not when it comes to your potential career choices. You stare at your resume, uncertain as to whether you put your educational successes first or highlight all of the summer internships you’ve had leading you to this point? Nothing makes sense. One minute you were having a blast and now you have to get serious and actually put all those years of study to some good use-after all EVERYONE is watching your next move!

Not that you need any more pressure than you already have right? Recent grads are entering the workforce in droves and older workers are not retiring fast enough to make room for you newbies. Now what do you do? If you are lucky enough to have a job then maybe you stick to it for awhile even if you are not that happy. Or, maybe you decide to hit the road with the band for a few years and sew your wild oats so to speak-let the job rush die down a bit? Or maybe you get cracking and figure out how to make the best of a depressing situation and find a job before your parents kick you out of the house.

You have undoubtedly by now read everything you can get your hands on regarding how to network, how to put a resume together, how to dress for an interview and of course how to accept a job offer when presented to you. So, I don’t want to cover old, tired ground, but here are a few things to think about that maybe your teachers, career books and advisors have not shared with you until now:

  1. They Lied To You: Well, maybe not intentionally but yes, job search is not what it once was. You have to do more than apply for jobs on the Internet or through referrals from your college career counselor you have to hit it hard and be smart about it. Sending mass amounts of paper into the ether is not going to raise the odds any although it might sound impressive when someone asks how you are doing on your job search. You will likely NOT get a job using only this approach. You need to work every and ANY connection you have and make a short-list of jobs, companies and contacts that you need to target like a sniper getting ready for combat. Get in the door any way you can and in person-use your computer for research and make sure you work all your connections!
  2. It’s Harder Than It Looks: As much as you think you are the best thing to graduate school and had the best grads, securing the job you want at a decent salary to pay the rent is harder than it may seem no matter what they told you. You are competing against yourself as well as all the others who are pounding the payment no matter how qualified you think you are. What does this mean? You should not quit before you even start but you should be realistic about your expectations. If this means you have to take, yes, wait for it, another internship to get your proverbial foot in the door-do it! You are not only competing against other recent grads, folks who have a few years under their belt but those baby-boomers who just won’t retire. It’s a tough out there and if you think your high grads, good school and strong work ethic are enough to land you a jog think again. You need to be creative and flexible about your approach to finding and accepting work even if it’s not the job you really want or the company you desire. You have got to build the foundation of your career and a resume full of summer jobs is not going to cut it against all the others who are battling the same job fight. Pick wisely, but by all means pick. Sometimes you got to start somewhere and getting a job on the resume may be your only option so loose the pride and take the job.
  3. End of the Rainbow: You have to make sure that no matter how hard it gets know that you may fail a few times before you find the success you are looking for. Being afraid to fail will inevitably lead you down the wrong road. Starting out is usually the hardest part of any project or venture you take on. Knowing that there is always an option to every job even if you have to accept a job that is lower in salary, responsibility or title-it’s okay. Take the job. Start your career. Worry about finding the end of your rainbow later. Don’t delay until things are perfect because they will never be perfect. You can change your mind later but the key is to choose and to make the best choice available to you at the time.

Fear is a good motivator even if it makes you realize that the normal, safe and appropriate job search strategies might not always be your best option. Realizing that sometimes you have to think creatively and assertively about what you want and how you will go about getting it may be all you need to get the job you want. Determination is as strong a motivator as fear and sometimes more powerful.

So the next time you want to hide behind the resume, the suit, or the interview prep questions, think about what you really want, find out who has the job you really want and get into see that person or persons and find out how you can do ANYTHING it takes to work there. That might be your best most sound advise you can take to finally get the job you want.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

 

 

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: My First Job-What I Need to Know …

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

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