Career Advice

How To Create a Mock Interview

Lisa Kaye - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 19:40

Sometimes you think you know how you come across to others but you don’t. You may think you rock in your presentation skills, or present a cool and calm presence or think you are a superstar when it comes to nailing a job interview. When was the last time you went on a job interview and what was the outcome? I thought so! If you’ve been pounding the pavement and think you are just doing fine networking your butt off then think again. If no one has offered you a job or even given you a second look, chances are you are not the picture perfect job candidate you may think you are.

Maybe it’s time for a lesson or two on how to objectively see yourself as others see you. We all think we know ourselves and we may even play twenty questions in front of the mirror admiring ourselves along the way. But do you really know what others think about you when you have just interviewed for a job? Do you ever ask for feedback and get a nervous response or a noncommittal answer? Do you leave the interview not quite sure what the other person thought or, had the perception you nailed the interview only never to hear back from the recruiter again? It’s not uncommon for recruiters or hiring managers to dodge the proverbial bullet when offering up feedback particularly if your interview did not go as well as you expected. That doesn’t mean they are a bunch of liars it just means most people, under pressure, don’t necessarily respond with honesty and directness. That’s not a judgment on you or the other person necessarily, but it does place the burden on you to become more self-aware and really understand how you are coming across.

So what is a mock interview and how can it help you polish up your interviewing skills?   A mock interview is just that, a fake, role-play exercise where you can practice how you present yourself in front of others. You can do this with another person as the interviewer, or you can do this in front of your laptop and record yourself before you go live in front of your next job interview. Here’s how to set up your mock interview:

  • Pick a comfortable setting like your living room, office, etc. (avoid the bedroom because you don’t want to look too comfortable).
  • Sit in a hard chair so that your back is straight and you have a good angle in front of the laptop, which you will place in front of you.
  • You will have already prepared or have asked someone else to prepare a list of 5-10 questions that you will answer in front of the camera.
  • Remember to wear something you would on an interview and prepare questions that you might be asked on an interview so that you are recreating as close to an actual interview you’ve experienced as possible.
  • If you can invite someone to ask you the questions off screen that’s fine, but you should begin the response to the question by incorporating part of the question in your answer. You can respond something like, “That’s a great question, how do I rate my overall job skills compared to my peers …” In this way, you can follow how you responded to each question when you go back to replay your interview.
  • Now the hard part, ask someone other than yourself to review the mock interview BEFORE you look at it. Choose someone you trust who will give you honest feedback. Write down, or have them write down the specific areas of feedback for each question you answered so you can have this to review when you view your recording.
  • Next, review your recording and have the list of feedback in front of you to go through when you critique each of your responses to the questions asked. The hardest part here is to try to look at yourself objectively.
  • When reviewing your mock interview, try not to focus on the details, if your hair was not in place or you were sitting slanted in the chair. For your first pass, focus on how well or not you verbally responded to the questions.
  • List out your own feedback, such as, did you hesitate often, did you use many “um’s” and “ah’s” when you answered the questions. View how quickly or slowly you spoke and focus on the timing of your responses.
  • Lastly, go back and critique your visual queues, appearance, posture, eye contact, any nervous habit you may not have noticed you had. Write down ALL of your observations so you have a complete list of how well you did and where you might need to improve.
  • When you complete your mock interview, create a Good/Not So Good list and put your feedback and that of the other person reviewing your recording down so you create a side-by-side comparison.   You should wait a few days before you go back and look at your mock interview again with fresh eyes to see if you pick up anything else you may add to your list.

Now that you have an “objective” observation you can critique your interviewing skills and hone up on areas where you may not have performed as well as you once imagined. It’s not a bad idea to use this to practice on your responses and come up with another list of questions and repeat the same process again in a week to see how well you improved. Remember that you are the best judge of your how well you come across and represent yourself to others. Next time you go on an interview, you’ll know exactly how someone sees you and whether or not

Originally posted in 4/2011

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: How To Create a Mock Interview

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

Should You Be Asking for More Money?

Career-Line - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 17:30

Compare yourself to other candidates to determine if you should be asking for more money.

This article Should You Be Asking for More Money? appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

5 Ways To Explain Yourself in a Job Interview

Lisa Kaye - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 10:12

I know you know what you are talking about but does anyone else? We often say things to sound prolific, savvy, or with it, but do you know how it sounds to the person sitting on the other side of the desk? It would be nice to walk around with a tape recorder all the time and hit “playback” to listen to the pearls of wisdom that trickle from your lips especially when you are in an interview. Trying to impress is one thing, but sounding like a moron is another. Here are a few examples of what my 12th grade English teacher would define as an “oxymoron.” If you are not sure what that means then maybe you should stop reading this and hit the dictionary. Or as my mother would say, “Look it up!”

Here are five unexpected side effects when you open your mouth in an interview:

  • “I’m really a strategic thinker but numbers is not my thing” Okay I’m not sure which part of being “strategic” equates to not being good with numbers, but basically you are signaling to a hiring manager that you like to “think” about things and come up with the ideas, but if you have to be held accountable for the results, say like making money, well, hey pick on someone else. Being a strategic thinker means being able to think about ALL facets of the equation, including how your ideas can or will make money for the company. Anyone can be chock full of ideas, but to be able to execute and deliver results-that takes someone who is truly “strategic”.
  • “I’m a great leader but I don’t like to fire people or give my staff feedback” Yes we all like to think we can lead a cause, a mission, a staff but heaven forbid we actually have to interact with any of these people! Being a leader doesn’t mean you get to delegate the tough stuff to say your HR Manager or your assistant. Being a leader means making tough decisions and being able to take fair and compassionate action when it involves giving someone on your staff feedback or worse, if you have to let someone go for any reason. Yes, it’s nice to have the corner office, designated parking spot or annual bonus but when it comes to being a true leader, you have to take the good with the bad and be able to handle the pressure with grace and dignity.
  • “I’m a creative, I really like to focus on my art” That line may have worked for Picasso but you don’t live in a flat in Paris and unless you work by yourself, you don’t have the luxury to hole it up in a wall somewhere and come out to play when you feel like it. Being creative doesn’t mean you are allowed to play the role of a sulking artist. You will need to develop not only your creative talents but your interpersonal ones as well. If you are not a champion for your own work, what makes you think anyone will be your champion? Come out and play and show the world how wonderful you really are!
  • “I’m great managing budgets but I hate the details”  Well, hey no one said your job was going to be easy. But I would not want you balancing my checkbook no matter how great you were with a calculator if you did not have some level of being detail-oriented and precise. Having attention deficit when it’s your job to manage other people’s money is not a skill set you want to highlight especially if you are being asked to manage projects, costs, deliverables and timelines. Having great attention to detail means you are not only good with numbers but you can catch stuff before it hits the ground.
  • I’m very detail oriented but hate reviewing my own work” Unless you have two sets of eyes and are the type who can do a cross word puzzle in ink, I suggest you take a few minutes to edit yourself before someone like your boss gives you feedback you might not like. It goes without saying that if you fancy yourself a detailed person than making sure your work is accurate is a given. Winging something because you think you are that good might work some of the time but if you are a detailed type, you’d spend a few minutes making sure you are truly as good as you believe you are.

So the next time you think you are characterizing yourself accurately to a recruiter or hiring manager, make sure to stop and think again. Be mindful of how your comments can be construed when speaking to someone who does not know you as well as you think you know yourself.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: 5 Ways To Explain Yourself in a Job Interview

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

The 8-Minute Resume

Career-Line - Mon, 08/15/2016 - 09:00

You’re eight minutes away from a better resume.

This article The 8-Minute Resume appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

Employers Hiring for August 2016

Career-Line - Tue, 08/09/2016 - 17:40

We have over 125,000 employers looking for new employees on Ladders, and we could use your help.

This article Employers Hiring for August 2016 appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

5 Keys To Your Summer Job Search

Lisa Kaye - Tue, 08/09/2016 - 10:10

Labor Day may be just around the corner and summer interns may be packing their bags to head back to school, but your summer job search has just begun! Even though you may feel like you need a break from all of the chaos that is your personal and work life, there is nothing like taking advantage of the job search marketplace when others are heading to Disneyland!

Wearing shorts and thongs this summer may be on your mind, but think how you might get a jump-start on the competition this fall by planning some strategic summer job search fun.

Here are five things you can do this summer to not waste your time and be ready the fall hiring season!

1-Summer Lunch: Your job search is like a summer picnic, be outside and enjoy the time with friends. Meeting, greeting and yes treating friends, colleagues and potential job leads over the summer when things can be a bit slower is a nice way to show your appreciation and when a job opportunity does appear, you can always reference the, “Hey great to see you last week, I just heard your company has an opening …”. Makes the ask seem natural and not forced and may be the best lunch you ever spent!

2-Wardrobe Review: You might like to wait for spring or fall to do your wardrobe purge, but summer might be a good time to spend both on clearing out your closet and shopping for some new “school” clothes. Finding deals, clearance sales and having something new to wear is a nice way to start your job search and find a reason to buy those new pair of shoes. Getting rid of anything in your closet you have not worn for more than a year is also another way to get yourself ready and clear at the unwanted in your life to make room for the new

3-Resume Redo: You might find it easier to redo your closet but finding time to review your resume might not be a bad way to spend your summer. Hiring a resource to help you with your resume, finding time to go through your list of accomplishments and updating any new skills or learning or awards you may have earned since your last interview is a good way to stay focused on the moment and get clear on what you want for the future.

4-Reference List: Spending quality time reaching out to those who may have helped you along the way, provided guidance and support when you needed it or were a mentor to you in some way, might be well worth your time to reconnect if you have not stayed in touch for awhile. Reaching out to your network of trusted advisors, BEFORE you actually need their help is a nice way to stay real and be genuine about your commitment and ask permission to use them as a reference in the future.

5-Have fun: Just because you feel you may need to look for work or are bored with your current situation, make the process of finding a new opportunity fun. Find ways to take the pressure off of you needing or wanting a new job. Know that you can and will land your next opportunity when you least expect it.

It’s always good to have a plan, but take the fading summer sun as a sign that it’s never too late to get ready for what you want and find time to have fun as well.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: 5 Keys To Your Summer Job Search

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

When the Kid Interviewing You Says You’re Too Old…

Career-Line - Tue, 08/02/2016 - 17:55

Since you can’t change your age, your goal is to address the underlying root causes of age discrimination.

This article When the Kid Interviewing You Says You’re Too Old… appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

12 Tricks to Appear Smart in Emails

Career-Line - Tue, 08/02/2016 - 15:52

This infographic comes from The Cooper Review, the brainchild of Sarah Cooper – author, demotivational speaker, and chief evangelist of evangelism.

This article 12 Tricks to Appear Smart in Emails appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

Job Interview 101 – Say What You Mean …

Lisa Kaye - Tue, 08/02/2016 - 11:03

I know you know what you are talking about but does anyone else? We often say things to sound prolific, savvy, or with it, but do you know how it sounds to the person sitting on the other side of the desk? It would be nice to walk around with a tape recorder all the time and hit “playback” to listen to the pearls of wisdom that trickle from your lips especially when you are in an interview. Trying to impress is one thing, but sounding like a moron is another. Here are a few examples of what my 12th grade English teacher would define as an “oxymoron.” If you are not sure what that means then maybe you should stop reading this and hit the dictionary. Or as my mother would say, “Look it up!”

Here are five unexpected side effects when you open your mouth in an interview:

  • “I’m really a strategic thinker but numbers is not my thing” Okay I’m not sure which part of being “strategic” equates to not being good with numbers, but basically you are signaling to a hiring manager that you like to “think” about things and come up with the ideas, but if you have to be held accountable for the results, say like making money, well, hey pick on someone else. Being a strategic thinker means being able to think about ALL facets of the equation, including how your ideas can or will make money for the company. Anyone can be chock full of ideas, but to be able to execute and deliver results-that takes someone who is truly “strategic”.
  • “I’m a great leader but I don’t like to fire people or give my staff feedback” Yes we all like to think we can lead a cause, a mission, a staff but heaven forbid we actually have to interact with any of these people! Being a leader doesn’t mean you get to delegate the tough stuff to say your HR Manager or your assistant. Being a leader means making tough decisions and being able to take fair and compassionate action when it involves giving someone on your staff feedback or worse, if you have to let someone go for any reason. Yes, it’s nice to have the corner office, designated parking spot or annual bonus but when it comes to being a true leader, you have to take the good with the bad and be able to handle the pressure with grace and dignity.
  • “I’m a creative, I really like to focus on my art” That line may have worked for Picasso but you don’t live in a flat in Paris and unless you work by yourself, you don’t have the luxury to hole it up in a wall somewhere and come out to play when you feel like it. Being creative doesn’t mean you are allowed to play the role of a sulking artist. You will need to develop not only your creative talents but your interpersonal ones as well. If you are not a champion for your own work, what makes you think anyone will be your champion? Come out and play and show the world how wonderful you really are!
  • “I’m great managing budgets but I hate the details”  Well, hey no one said your job was going to be easy. But I would not want you balancing my checkbook no matter how great you were with a calculator if you did not have some level of being detail-oriented and precise. Having attention deficit when it’s your job to manage other people’s money is not a skill set you want to highlight especially if you are being asked to manage projects, costs, deliverables and timelines. Having great attention to detail means you are not only good with numbers but you can catch stuff before it hits the ground.
  • I’m very detail oriented but hate reviewing my own work” Unless you have two sets of eyes and are the type who can do a cross word puzzle in ink, I suggest you take a few minutes to edit yourself before someone like your boss gives you feedback you might not like. It goes without saying that if you fancy yourself a detailed person than making sure your work is accurate is a given. Winging something because you think you are that good might work some of the time but if you are a detailed type, you’d spend a few minutes making sure you are truly as good as you believe you are.

So the next time you think you are characterizing yourself accurately to a recruiter or hiring manager, make sure to stop and think again. Be mindful of how your comments can be construed when speaking to someone who does not know you as well as you think you know yourself.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: Job Interview 101 – Say What You Mean …

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

When You Look in the Mirror, I Smile

Career-Line - Tue, 07/26/2016 - 17:00

Find out how a simple mirror can improve your likelihood of landing the job.

This article When You Look in the Mirror, I Smile appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

10 Ways To Ask For Job Help

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 07/25/2016 - 10:06

It’s never easy to ask for help. You want to believe you can do it on your own. Asking for help sometimes implies weakness or defeat. When you ask for help you don’t want to feel like you need the help-like there is something lacking in your ability to help yourself. It’s no different when you ask for help with your job search. It doesn’t matter if you are a big shot in your profession or are looking for any entry-level position. Asking for help takes courage, strength, dignity and a whole lot of common sense. D you know when is the right time to ask for help? Do you know if it’s appropriate to ask for help from anyone or just those you feel comfortable with?

Asking for help may not come easy for you but knowing how and when to express the need is not only crucial but beneficial when you want it the most. Asking for help is not a crime and should not be perceived that way. When you finally reach out and ask for help it signals that you are open and willing to accept a hand in whatever form it shows up. Next time you find yourself in a position to ask for help here are some things you might consider:

1-Make sure you feel comfortable with the concept of asking for help BEFORE you reach out to your friends and professional network. Doing something that feels unnatural or uncomfortable will sound like begging and not a request for assistance.

2-Know what kind of help to ask for and from whom is important piece in figuring out how reasonable your request for assistance is and who might be in a position to offer you support.

3-Never solely rely on a friendship or family status to help you get a job or a connection for help with a job. Lead with your skills and talents.

4-Offer to take someone to dinner or lunch to help you “pick their brain” and have them pick up the tab instead.

5-Ask for help not just for yourself but also for a friend, spouse, child, and niece.

6-Put someone in an awkward position by asking for unsolicited feedback on how well you interview, or your character, or if they are able to find you a job.

7-Reconnecting with someone you have not spoken to just for the sole purpose of asking for help with a job search or negotiate a job offer.

8-Stalking someone on social media or LinkedIn for the sole purpose of connecting with them to help you find a job without context or a good reason.

9-Asking for references from someone you have not heard from in awhile just because you may need them in the future whether you have a new job offer or not.

10-Connecting with someone you don’t know on LinkedIn to ask for help connecting to a job or company because you work there even though you don’t know that person.

Asking for job assistance is not a bad thing or at least it shouldn’t be. Knowing how to leverage your network of friends and contacts is an art form that takes time and practice. There is a social skill you need to know how to ask for help in a way that does not offend. Some people have it others do not. Finding what works for you and making sure you are both courteous, respectful and kind is part of the etiquette required when asking anyone for help no matter what the situation.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

 

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: 10 Ways To Ask For Job Help

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

Folks Who are Thinking of Hiring Someone Like You

Career-Line - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 16:45

We name the best employers and recruiters in the country each season, so we’d like to congratulate the “Top Recruitment Professionals in America” for Summer 2016.

This article Folks Who are Thinking of Hiring Someone Like You appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

When Being Transparent Isn’t Always Clear…

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 07/18/2016 - 11:03

You may pride yourself on such admirable qualities as, honesty, directness, integrity and the willingness to be open and transparent in your dealings with others that would make any prospective employer stand up and take notice. But when the view you have of yourself differs from how others perceive you, the disconnect can often have dire consequences. Being self-aware is an important attribute no matter what the situation but it’s never more important when you put yourself out there for a new job, a promotion or career opportunity.

You may have a charming and disarming demeanor with the ability to light up the room with a wink and a smile. Those traits may get you far on the social scene but knowing how and when to turn on the charm in a professional setting is equally as important. You may have a new boss, recently changed jobs or are in the process of accepting a job offer when you decide that it’s best to “tell all” in an attempt to either bond, connect or be “transparent.” Knowing your audience is the first rule in understanding when to offer too much information. You might think sharing your intimate thoughts, desires, likes and dislikes is a way to become close to someone, a way to relate, to connect on a deeper level. But when your “transparency leaves someone dazed and confused and in some cases offended by your lack of judgment and respect, you might scratch your head and wonder, “How did I misread that one?”

It might be hard sometimes to know what is appropriate when you think you are being affable and open particularly in a new professional relationship. By not understanding the boundaries, you can be perceived as inappropriate and lacking in judgment and or common sense. Knowing that every step you make leading up to and accepting a job offer is carefully scrutinized even before they start the reference checking process.

So when you think you are being transparent, check a few things before you move full speed ahead and pull the curtain back to reveal all.

  1. Don’t jump the hierarchy chain of command when you are not getting your answers met, ask what the appropriate steps are for resolving any disputes before deciding to take matters into your own hands.
  2. Avoid sending smiley faces, funny gifs and emoticons to show how you really “feel” trust me, they will get it without the elaborate icons.
  3. Try not to mix business with pleasure when you are having a relaxed conversation about the weekend and decide to discuss an increase in pay, title, benefits that suddenly turns your cocktail party into a hostage negotiation.
  4. Don’t make the mistake of assuming your new, soon-to-be boss is your best friend and in an effort to be “open” discuss things that are best left for your mother or your therapist.
  5. Knowing when “no” means “no” in any point of a professional relationship and understanding when it’s appropriate to push back and when it is not.
  6. Divulging more about your personal health, social or economic status to a prospective employer is not appropriate even if you have the promotion or job offer in hand.
  7. Cutting people out who are your allies and have been part of the decision making process because you somehow feel it makes better sense to be “transparent” on your own without any help or adult supervision.
  8. Not understanding the appropriateness of knowing when to keep your mouth shut and knowing when to push forward in an attempt to be heard or get what you want.
  9. Understanding that just because you feel “comfortable” in your dealings with someone does not mean you can step over the line and ask for something that is unreasonable or where you have already been told, “no.”
  10. Having enough common sense to know when to manage expectations, apologize when you overstep the boundary and offer up more than is needed or wanted and to know when enough is really enough.

Most people only have one shot at getting it right when it comes to a work situation. Some people are lucky and get a second chance. Being smart enough not to blow up an opportunity when you have a lot riding on it and to know when to read the signs will get you far in life. Just because you pride yourself on being “transparent” does not mean that it’s clear how and when to move forward. You have to develop better vision than being transparent if you want to be truly clear on how to move forward in your career.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: When Being Transparent Isn’t Always Clear…

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

I Had a Bad Day

Career-Line - Tue, 07/12/2016 - 09:00

Here’s how to bounce back from a bad day on the job hunt.

This article I Had a Bad Day appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

5 Things To Piss Off A Recruiter

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 10:57

When it comes to making a good first impression do you tend to “over compensate” and push too hard? Listen it’s hard to know how you should behave to a total stranger especially one who has the power to get you your next job. Knowing how to act and knowing what drives recruiters crazy is the first step to not making it your last step when you show up for an interview.

Next time you find yourself in front of a perfect stranger who has your career in the palm of their hands here are a few things to avoid if you want them to ever call you back:

  1. Fidget & Fuss: We all get nervous especially on an interview for a job you really want. But acting like you can’t hold it together is not going to score any real points with the recruiter. Shifting in your chair, biting your nails, playing with your hair or an object, chewing gum are all signs that you are not able to act and behave professionally when under pressure. You are being judged for your professionalism as well as your skills so remember when interviewing for the part you better learn how to act the part first.
  2. Sweaty Hands: Some people just naturally sweat and some people take it to an art form especially when they are nervous. No one likes to shake a wet towel and then have to wipe their hands off on their clothes afterwards. If you are one of those that have to wring your hands (and feet) from sweaty glands, you can try a little trick before you are introduced to a recruiter. Try carrying small can of deodorant spray or wipes in your pocket and gingerly apply a small amount to your hands. Avoid using powder or dry deodorant as they leave a sticky feeling and white residue that will likely get all over the recruiter’s hands. Alcohol wipes or Purell also act as a drying agent if you have room to carry them. Remember dry before you apply.
  3. “You Think I’ll Get The Job?” Asking the recruiter about your chances before you even get through the first interview shows you are too eager and maybe just a little desperate – no one wants to be harassed! You may want to know about your chances and how well you stack up against the other candidates but best to save that for a follow up email or the next round of interviews assuming you get a call back. Don’t be too pushy or forceful please learn to play it cool.
  4. “Do You Have Any Questions? When asked if you have any questions either about the job or the company, don’t sit there with a blank stare or simply state, “Nope, I got it!” The recruiter does not want to be the only one talking and asking questions and it’s good to show you did your homework before you came in for an interview. Being prepared with a few questions, even if they are general ones, shows that you have given the process some thought and that you are interested in the company and knowledgeable about its products and services. Staring down the recruiter should not be your only response.
  5. “How much?” We all want to be paid fairly for work but putting the recruiter on the spot about salary and compensation in a first meeting may not be the right approach. If you are asked about your compensation requirements be honest and tell them what you are currently making or, that you did some research and would like a salary between a specific range. It’s best if you do not initiate conversation about salary unless asked on a first meeting or you will likely put the recruiter on the spot as they sometimes are not fully aware of the budget or range. Trust me, if they like you, they will make the compensation work for you-wait until you are asked.

Making sure you make the best first impression means you are aware of how you come across in making the interviewer feel comfortable and relaxed. That doesn’t mean you should pull out pictures of your family vacation, but learning to read the queues and keeping it professional will ensure you at least a follow up interview if not a job offer.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: 5 Things To Piss Off A Recruiter

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

Ladders’ Top 200 Recruiters: Q2 2016

Career-Line - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 09:00

Ladders reveals its most influential recruiters of Q2 2016.

This article Ladders’ Top 200 Recruiters: Q2 2016 appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

What Are You Willing to Struggle For?

Career-Line - Tue, 07/05/2016 - 17:06

Because if you want the benefits of something in life, you have to also want the costs.

This article What Are You Willing to Struggle For? appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

Game of Jobs

Lisa Kaye - Fri, 07/01/2016 - 08:13

Whether you are a warrior, a dragon slayer or someone who dons many faces, you have at one point in your career played the inevitable “Game of Jobs.” You might not have thought you were auditioning for a part at work, but that is what inevitably happens. Like any complex relationship, you are taught to play a part in the drama that has become your “work life.”

Not everyone plays the villain in this drama, but chances are you will run into some challenges with some of your co-workers or your boss along the way. If you are in a leadership position you might feel the need to surround yourself with allies who can take up the fight and support your efforts when needed. Or, you can be an up and comer who is taking prisoners on your climb to the top. If you feel like you are someone who has to look over your shoulder after every group meeting, maybe your instincts about watching your back are not too far from the truth?

Politics on any stage is a game for the seasoned and not the thin-skinned. You have to know who has your back and who will throw you under the bus even if they don’t work directly with you. Your enemies come in many forms, anywhere from the parking attendant to the CFO. Knowing how to navigate these politics is part of your game of jobs if you are going to survive the battle and ultimately win the war.

Mapping out your strategy is important to your ultimate success. Here are three key factors in any leaders ability to survive the Game of Jobs:

1- Know Your Enemies: They come in many shapes and sizes and positions within the hierarchy of your organization. Even if you think you are well liked, chances are you may have pissed someone off whether you intended to or not. Taking an inventory of your allies is part of your ability to shore up your resources and knows who is there to help you when you are going to need it.

2- Making Nice With Everyone: Even if your heart is not in it, knowing who you can trust and making sure you treat them with dignity and respect is part of building your allies and internal support system. Even though you think you don’t need it, you will one day. Everyone needs a support system even if you are looking to earn more money, get promoted or just make a move to a nicer office or workspace. You need to learn how to play nice even if you think you don’t need anyone to help you get to the next level of your career ascension.

3-Being on the Receiving End: A little humility goes a long way if you can earn the respect of your co-workers and superiors. Nothing screams success unless you can get other people singing your praises. You may not have done anything substantial, but just showing others you care and have their back will help you ensure you are recognized as a true leader amongst your peers.

Being able to navigate the treacherous career landscape that has come to define your career success may have its ups and downs, but knowing who and when to partner with the right people who will help you is one of the most important steps in your game of jobs. Otherwise when winter comes, you could be the one out in the cold staring up at the wall!

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

 

 

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: Game of Jobs

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

Celebrating Job Independence Day!

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 06/27/2016 - 10:15

Job Independence simply stated comes from never having to be a slave to your work. Whether that implies you are content being self-employed, not employed or a long timer at a job, your independence comes from calling your own shots and never having to feel restricted by anyone or anything.

You may think job freedom is a luxury for the rich or the famous and would not apply to you. Think again. Creating a career where you have the freedom to choose is your first step towards true emancipation. Having the ability to decide what type of job you want and whether the one you have is good enough opens the gates to allow you to walk in or walk out of any job situation that may not be right for you. Your career freedom comes from being able to pick and choose and from knowing that you can celebrate your job freedom by not working and going to school if that’s what you decide.

There are many people around the world who do not have the freedom of choice whether it’s in their job, their home or in their relationships. Realizing that you live in a time where flexibility, fluidity and the fact you can call your own shots is an honored tradition, gives you the courage and ability to take leaps where you may not have dared to jump before.

What does true Job Independence mean to you? How do you value your ability to be free when it comes to your career choices and do you take full advantage of your options? As you move into 4th of July celebration mode, ask yourself a few questions to determine whether you truly possess job independence:

  1. Can I walk away at any time?: Knowing that you are not trapped by your circumstances means you have a good sense of freedom when it comes to moving out of a job that you no longer like or where you are not growing. Most people stay at a job for financial reasons and because the fear in moving into a new position may be too overwhelming for them and they’d rather just stay where they are. Nothing screams “prison” like being held hostage by your lack of career choices and to stay in a job you hate no matter how valid the reason.
  2. Can I say “no” to my work?   Complete freedom comes from being able to not only walk away from a situation that is not right for you but to be able to say “no” to work that is not to your liking. How many people do you know that have that option? You don’t need to rebel against the hierarchy in order to be heard, but being able to professionally assert yourself is the key to true job independence.
  3. Do I have true flexibility? Choosing whether to stay with your job is one thing but do you have the freedom to come and go as you please at work and make your own schedule? Having creative freedom in your work projects is as important to creating job independence as your ability to walk away from your job or to show up to work when you want.

Having job independence means you are not limited by your surroundings and you can make your way at any time and under any circumstances. If you are lucky enough to have true job freedom, than you have much to celebrate this holiday!

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

Original Post, July, 2014

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: Celebrating Job Independence Day!

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

Three Ways You’re Sabotaging Yourself

Career-Line - Mon, 06/20/2016 - 08:00

While you’re reviewing the thousands of job openings and employers on Ladders this week, here are three ways you just might be sabotaging your own job search (without realizing it)!

This article Three Ways You’re Sabotaging Yourself appeared first on Expert Career Advice | Ladders.

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