Worklife Survival

Tats & Views…

Lisa Kaye - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 10:45

So you think everyone has a keen appreciation for the multi-colored art you have displayed on your inner thigh or your forearm? It’s not like anyone would dare say a nasty comment about the word “Mother” tattooed on your hand? When it comes to art what do people know anyway. Judged or be judged? Not when it comes to your interview. Think again Picasso…

You may like what you wear, your piercings or the multitude of graffiti art proudly displayed on your body but chances are not everyone has your same level of appreciation or taste. So when it comes to “dressing” the part, how do you navigate the sterile waters of interview land when you are covered in tats way down to your toes? Knowing your audience no matter what job you are applying for means making sure you don’t give up your individuality for professionalism no matter how artfully you are decked out. When the world of tats and views collide here are a few things to remember.

  1. Do Your Homework: If you are thinking of applying for a position in a company where the culture resembles a laboratory, think about what you should wear to the interview before you show up all covered in ink. No one is asking you to change who you are or what defines you. But knowing that others may or may not have the same level of appreciation for your image might make it hard to break the barrier to entry when all you are trying to do is get a job. Hey, even Cher has to cover the ink for a part in a movie-so think of it as your audition.
  2. Keep It Simple: When in doubt about whom you are meeting or the work environment best advice is to keep it simple. This means save all the jewelry, chains, metal and accouterment for the clubs or your casual look and try to package your wear in something more main stream and toned down. No one wants to cramp your style but less is more when you don’t know who is on the other end of the interview judging you before they even look at your resume or portfolio. Be smart about your choices.
  3. Don’t Take It Personal: Keeping your demeanor as professional as possible during an interview speaks volumes to who you are as an individual and how well you present yourself to someone you just met. Not everyone will like you no matter how well you come across so no point in trying to manipulate the situation to your advantage. Being yourself means honoring who you are and what you stand for. Flaunting yourself no matter how minimal shows a lack of respect for the other person and makes people feel uneasy. Remember, not everyone has your taste level so don’t make someone feel bad because you are picking up a vibe that makes you feel uncomfortable. When in doubt remember it’s not personal it’s business.

You are your own person and you should not change for anyone. Choosing a company culture that embrace that philosophy will help you target a place where you want to work. Making sure you understand that not everyone is looking at you in the same way you see yourself helps you to anticipate how to act during an interview meeting. Becoming self-aware helps you manage first encounters and shows you are insightful. First impressions do count so make the most out of yours by dressing the part and knowing your lines.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

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Copyright © 2014 Lisa Kaye | HR | Consulting | Los Angeles | Entertainment | Human Resources | Search - The Career Rebel
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Interviewing For Your Job…

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 09:11

It might provide some peace of mind when you think you have it all and that you are nice and comfy in your current job with nothing to worry about. Just because you get a steady paycheck, have been temping in a job for a year or more or are liked by the powers that be, does not guarantee you’ve got the job in the bag. Interviewing for your job means you may have still to audition for the part just when you think the casting call is over.

Having the inside track on a position when you are currently working for the company of your dreams does not always guarantee success. Finding and keeping a job is never a sure thing not when situations out of your control at work change the dynamics of the workplace and you are caught in the middle of a game of hide and seek. You are always on the spot when it comes to keeping your job. Remember there are no guarantees that you are the one they want even if you are busting your butt at work to prove yourself to those that matter most, the decision makers. Situations come and go and people change their minds as it relates to who they want to hire for a particular position.

If you have your sights set on landing and keeping a job, remember there are a few things to keep in mind when you are asked to interview for a job you were sure was yours in the first place:

  1. Assessing the Competition: Who are you competing against? What is it about your skills vs. someone else’s that are better or worse in comparison? Understanding who you are competing against and what the hiring powers are looking for in a candidates will help you position yourself for success when it comes to being considered for a job you thought you already had.
  2. Managing Your Expectations: Everyone wants to be liked and valued in what they do and working and interviewing for a job is no exception. But knowing that there are some things that are out of your control helps you to manage your perception on your candidacy for a position even though you think it’s a slam-dunk and you are the perfect person for the job. Keeping your expectations in check means you are level headed about your situation and will be confident about how you are likely to interview for the job when asked.
  3. It’s Not Personal: As much as it feels like you are entering a beauty contest when it comes to managing your job expectations, learning how to make it less personal and to keep it professional will help you to keep the feedback objective. If you are not sure why you were passed over, it was probably less likely about how you look or spoke and more about the person involved in making the hiring decision. Keep it professional remember it’s not about a popularity contest.

When it comes to wanting to impress someone you work with or who is making a hiring decision that involves you, make sure you are positioning yourself in the best way possible. Surround yourself with allies and people who support your work and are not afraid to speak up on your behalf and you will be one step closer to keeping the job of your dreams in place even though you may not have thought you had to fight for it.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

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7 Things NOT To Do In An Interview…

Lisa Kaye - Sun, 07/13/2014 - 13:58

Well you got the call and you are finally set up to meet with a team of people at the company you’ve been dying to work for. Maybe you just lost your job, maybe you quit unexpectedly because you could not take it, or, like some you keep knocking on every door hoping someone will answer. You are not alone. It’s hard to figure out what will and won’t work when you are meeting new people for the first time. Perhaps someone refers you for the job that is high up in the organization like the CEO and the position you are applying for is an entry level one-how do you position yourself? Or, you could have a friend or relative in the company that put in a good word for you, how much do you leverage your connections for the right opportunity? When it comes to meeting people for the first time on an interview, how much is too much information and what can help or hurt you land the job?

When it comes to making a good impression though, here are a few things to consider when you finally do get your interview and want to really impress the hiring team:

  1. “I’m sure I can figure it out?” When it comes to describing what your skill level is and what systems or processes you are familiar with it’s best to be honest and not try to impress someone for the sake of it. Your skills are one of many professional attributes you possess that are important to a hiring manager. Understanding and presenting yourself accurately is key when asked about skills you may not have. Telling a hiring manager you can figure it out does not leave anyone with a sense of confidence that you can master the skills for the job. Shoot straight and tell it like it is when it comes to describing what you know.
  2. “It’ not personal”: So you maybe lucky enough to know the right people but flaunting your relationship with a senior member of the company is not the way to impress the hiring team. Remember, these folks likely report to or work for the top gun. Your relationship whether real or imagined may threaten folks you are meeting with. Describing your relationship with the person who may have referred you for the job as “personal” rather than “professional” send out all the wrong signals and puts everyone who meets you in an uneasy position. Keep your personal and professional boundaries apart and be clear you are not there to forge a personal connection you are there because you want the job.
  3. “Wink & rub”: Responding to a question or comment posed by the interviewer with a “wink and rub” of the hand is not an appropriate gesture if you want to be taken seriously in an interview. You may have some good skills, but knowing how to present yourself in a professional manner will help you land the job you want and not offend the people you may work with. Touching, winking or giggling should be saved for a date and not an interview.
  4. “Sending gifts,” You may think it’s a courteous gesture to thank someone for interviewing you. No one likes it when you send chocolates, flowers or balloons to the interview team and thank them for interviewing you for the job. Bottom line, it’s viewed as “bribery” no matter how insignificant the size of the gift. Sending a follow up email, note or letter is a much more appropriate response to saying “thank you” than a Starbucks’ gift card.
  5. Trying too hard: Answering every response with “I can do that” is not a way to reassure a hiring manager that you know what you are talking about. You may be eager to please but being too eager is a sign of desperation and not of someone who wants to pitch in and be a team member. Being direct about what you can and can’t do on an interview gains you far more points that trying to be a pleaser.
  6. Doesn’t be a groupie: Everyone wants to interview someone who is interested in the company and the people who work there. But don’t feel the need to recite the entire employee directory for the company. You will likely come off as a stalker or a groupie rather than someone who is in the know and has done your homework. Underplay your relationships and talk about the company and its products and services if you want to impress someone with your knowledge rather than recite the employee listing.
  7. Chewing, biting & crunching: The only thing that should come out of your mouth on an interview is your words and not what you are eating. Chewing gum (no matter how delicately you chew), biting your lips or crunching on candy are all distractions to the interviewer and are really not appropriate during an interview. If you are thirsty ask for water don’t consume a small meal.
  8. “The color of Halle Berry’s skin please” And when someone DOES offer you a drink whether it is water or coffee (best to ask for water it’s less complicated) don’t be cute enough to describe how you like your coffee as the skin color preference of a major celebrity. It might be cute in a coffee shop, but it certainly doesn’t win you over with a recruiter whose probably got ten more candidates lined up after you and has to try to figure out the complexion of Halle Berry’s skin tone! Not cute or cool under any circumstance.

Remember, first impressions count and you do only have one shot to make it stick. Make sure you don’t say or do anything that will make you appear less than qualified for a job you really want. You are what you say and what you do in an interview so make sure the lasting impression you leave is not something they will talk or tweet about once you leave. If you want a call back, act like a star not a starlet!

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

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10 Overused Resume Terms

Lisa Kaye - Tue, 07/08/2014 - 01:17

Making it to the interview stage may seem like a long, endless journey with you not knowing how it will end up. You may get a job offer, you may be passed over for the job or you may just feel like it’s not the right match. It might feel great when you get the call and they want to set you up for an interview but do you ask yourself how you even got that far? It may have been through an introduction or it may just have been the compelling words on your resume whatever the reason knowing what terms or phrases to avoid on your resume might help you get one step closer to landing the perfect job.

What does your resume really say about you?   If you ever wondered what works and what does not work when it comes to impressing someone you don’t even know here are a few “overused” words and phrases that you might consider eliminating from your resume if you want even a fighting chance at nailing the next job interview:

  1. Thought Leader: When it comes to describing your leadership qualities and those you may admire in others, using this phrase to highlight your ability to be both thoughtful and a leader in one phrase seems over reaching and not a great way to explain how you truly think, feel and lead.
  2. Thinking Outside The Box: Depending on whose box you are thinking “in” or “out” of may not be to your advantage when you are trying to explain how “creative” a thinker you really are. Best to think of another way that bests describe your ability to be innovative by citing a few key business examples rather than overusing a phrase that really isn’t very original to begin with.
  3. Strategic Thinker: Much like being a thought leader being strategic is not something you need to think too much about if you are truly “strategic”. Showing someone how strategic you are is always about highlighting your professional results and not merely declaring you are able to think or act strategically. You need to prove it in order to convince someone else that you are strategic.
  4. Results Oriented: Your orientation towards results is a given if you are good at what you do. Stating that fact is one thing but highlighting your accomplishments and the way your results increased profitability for the company is another. Show me the money and we’ll show you results.
  5. Highly Motivated: You may be motivated by your work and your ambition to succeed but telling someone you don’t know in your resume about your motivations is not necessarily going to win you any extra points. Let’s put it this way, one would hope you are motivated, no need to pronounce it as some professional revelation.
  6. Change Agent: Not everyone likes change. Change for change sake is not necessarily something you need to brag about. Being an agent of change implies you can make things happen. Just be careful that your agent status does not make you seem like you are a security breach or a career operative.
  7. Dynamic: Being a dynamo is great when you are setting up a dating profile but describing yourself that way in a work situation is not necessarily the way to get the support of others. Describing yourself as “dynamic” is great if you are trying out for a professional soccer league.
  8. Bottom Line: When describing your skills like a balance sheet be careful not to make yourself appear to be so goal oriented that you miss the big picture. Being able to relate to the people in your professional circle the way you can manage your departmental budget takes more skill than being a bottom line bouncer.
  9. Best in Class: This might work for entry into a “dog show” competition but not when you are trying to explain how great you are as it relates to your professional skills. Save the “best in” for a beauty contest and not your resume.
  10. Team Player: This phrase may have meaning when watching the World Cup but when you talk about how well you play with others in the workplace, it’s not necessary to let everyone know you can and will play nicely with other employees if your job depended on it.

Making sure you represent yourself in person as well as you do on your resume should not be considered an art form, but should take more than just common sense when you make an effort to stand out.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

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Copyright © 2014 Lisa Kaye | HR | Consulting | Los Angeles | Entertainment | Human Resources | Search - The Career Rebel
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Job Independence

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 06/30/2014 - 11:51

Job Independence simply stated comes from never having to be a slave to your work.  Whether that implies you are content being self-employed, not employed or a long timer at a job, your independence comes from calling your own shots and never having to feel restricted by anyone or anything.

You may think job freedom is a luxury for the rich or the famous and would not apply to you.  Think again.  Creating a career where you have the freedom to choose is your first step towards true emancipation.  Having the ability to decide what type of job you want and whether the one you have is good enough opens the gates to allow you to walk in or walk out of any job situation that may not be right for you.  Your career freedom comes from being able to pick and choose and from knowing that you can celebrate your job freedom by not working and going to school if that’s what you decide.

There are many people around the world who do not have the freedom of choice whether it’s in their job, their home or in their relationships. Realizing that you live in a time where flexibility, fluidity and the fact you can call your own shots is an honored tradition, gives you the courage and ability to take leaps where you may not have dared to jump before.

What does true Job Independence mean to you?  How do you value your ability to be free when it comes to your career choices and do you take full advantage of your options? As you move into 4th of July celebration mode, ask yourself a few questions to determine whether you truly possess job independence:

  1. Can I walk away at any time?:  Knowing that you are not trapped by your circumstances means you have a good sense of freedom when it comes to moving out  of a job that you no longer like or where you are not growing.  Most people stay at a job for financial reasons and because the fear in moving into a new position may be too overwhelming for them and they’d rather just stay where they are.  Nothing screams “prison” like being held hostage by your lack of career choices and to stay in a job you hate no matter how valid the reason.
  2. Can I say “no” to my work?   Complete freedom comes from being able to not only walk away from a situation that is not right for you but to be able to say “no” to work that is not to your liking.  How many people do you know that have that option?  You don’t need to rebel against the hierarchy in order to be heard, but being able to professionally assert yourself is the key to true job independence.
  3. Do I have true flexibility?  Choosing whether to stay with your job is one thing but do you have the freedom to come and go as you please at work and make your own schedule?  Having creative freedom in your work projects is as important to creating job independence as your ability to walk away from your job or to show up to work when you want.

Having job independence means you are not limited by your surroundings and you can make your way at any time and under any circumstances.  If you are lucky enough to have true job freedom, than you have much to celebrate this holiday!

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

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Creating Jobs Without Borders

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 06/23/2014 - 13:34

One might think that if all else fails you might want to pack it up for another continent and look for a new job!  But what if it was you and not your job that needed new boundaries?  What if you were to decide just how far you needed to move in order to find the right opportunity?  We all get stuck from time to time thinking we can’t find a job outside of our chosen profession or an industry we’ve grown to love to hate. Not true for you or anyone else looking to make a radical career change.

You are able to set boundaries when it comes to your career choices.  Nothing needs to be where it is if it does not fit your needs or your future desires.  Setting borders around what you want and what you don’t when it comes to your career is as simple as making and sticking to your decisions.

Having a sense of what you want may be as easy as deciding what cities you’d like to consider living in from knowing that you are nor interested in a relocation or moving to another country.  Your career boundary is about picking and choosing situations and people that meet your career expectations.

You are who you want to be even if there are some days where you may feel like being someone else would be a whole lot easier.  Your career border provides you with some much needed guide posts to help you from veering too far off from your desired goal.  Figuring out your job desires means you are clear on what and where you want to be.

The road may be paved with many choices but setting the proper boundaries helps to eliminate any obstacles and distractions that might get in the way.  You are not supposed to panic every time a career obstacle pops up in your path.  Making the proper choices means you are ready and willing to take risks even when the borders are unclear.  Here are a few things to consider when establishing job border:

  1. Make a choice:  You may have lots of options available to you or you may be stuck on what to do next.  The first step in creating your job border is to define the boundaries of your desire and to make a decision on where you’d like to go.  Having a strong sense of self coupled with the desire to achieve certain goals will help you to establish the job borders you need in order to move ahead in your career.
  2. Pivot:   Knowing you will stumble on many distractions and lose your footing when it comes to staying the course is a given no matter how prepared you are when you venture out into the unknown job world. Having and maintaining your focus on your next career goal helps you to avoid unnecessary detours in an already crowded path.
  3. Charge to the Finish:  You may feel uncertain along the way about where you need to go when it comes to deciding and sticking to your career.  But when you have the end goal in site, there is nothing that should make you pause or hesitate when you are about to charge to the finish line.

When it comes to establishing your job border know that you are the only obstacle that can make or break your chances for success.

 Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

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Job Purge

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 06/16/2014 - 11:12

Like the movie of a similar name, wouldn’t it be great to have one night a year to purge your sins away without retribution?  What would it be like if you were to purge your job history in much the same way?  What if you were able to get rid of those job duties, internships, positions, you took because you had to not because you wanted to and you could erase them from your job history once and for all.  If you could get rid of some of the less flattering parts of  your job history what would you purge?

Proactively purging your job history is not meant to encourage you to lie or to misrepresent information on your resume.  You can “emphasize the positive and eliminate the negative” as the song states without recreating history. Learning how to spin your resume and eliminate the information that no longer helps promote your best skills and qualifications is part of your purge.  It’s not easy for some to weed out information from a resume, but learning how to determine what stands out from information that is repetitive will help make the process move more quickly.  You might need to engage the help of a professional or a friend to put a fresh perspective on what might seem like a given for you.  Emphasizing what is important from what is irrelevant helps you make sense out of an otherwise complicated mess of information.

Having the ability to objectively look at your self takes time and an honest point of view. Not everyone can decipher what is important from what is not when it comes to their job history.  Here are a few ways to look at your resume and help you purge what no longer tells the story you want everyone to hear:

  1. Wash, Rinse, Repeat:  Looking at your job history is like doing laundry, there is a cycle and process for everything. When you are unsure of what to include in your resume, make sure you are consistent in how you present your skills and accomplishments.  Keep in mind listing your accomplishments consistently means that you focus on only those goals, which are meaningful and measureable and you get rid of anything that is redundant or merely a “fun fact.”
  2. Simply Stated:  Including metrics such as revenue goals, staff size, departmental budget responsibility or how you may have increased or decreased key business measurements are important to include in your list of accomplishments.  By eliminating statements that are not supported by quantitative measures, you purge what is unnecessary and highlight what is important and meaningful to the business as a whole not just your specific job.
  3. Make It Pretty:  Formatting and layout of your resume is as important as the information that is contained within it.  Taking the time to eliminate unnecessary or inconsistent formatting signals that you are detail oriented and want to present your information in a clean and consistent way. No one likes to read a list of dates that don’t tie into position or company names.  If you have held more than one job in a company there is a right and a wrong way to list out the information to make it easy for the reader to follow.

When it comes to telling the story of how good you are, getting rid of irrelevant information, cleaning up your job progression or eliminating unrelated skills from your job history, helps you frame the story and makes the recruiter yearn for even more than the first page may hold.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

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Career Baggage

Lisa Kaye - Sun, 06/08/2014 - 15:20

Whether you are packing bags for a road trip or an overnight stay with a friend or rummaging through boxes you have stored in the garage from your past jobs, clearing away your career baggage is should not wait until spring cleaning!  We all keep things longer than we need or have to.  Maybe we think we’ll need something from our past one-day, or perhaps it’s just too hard to let go of items for sentimental reasons.  Hanging onto things including items from your past jobs, might seem like a nice idea at the time but can soon turn you into a career hoarder if you are not careful.

We all need to learn when it’s time to purge.  Cleaning out and clearing out are signs that you are making room for new experiences and opportunities to come into your life.  Whether you are giving up old ways of thinking or simply throwing out years of stored files that you will never use again, making room in your life for the new helps you eliminate career baggage and lighten the load for you to move forward freely.

Baggage comes in many forms not just the stuff that’s hidden away in storage or at the back of your desk drawer.  You may have stored away feelings of doubt and frustration over your career in a way that binds you to emotional baggage that weighs you down and makes it hard for you to move ahead.  Emotional baggage may be because you were turned down for a promotion, had a poor performance review or struggled with a co-worker or boss. You may have doubts about your communication skills or your ability to lead and manage and wonder whether you will ever get ahead in your career.

Career baggage can take many forms not just the physical stuff you hold onto but the emotional wounds that you won’t let heal.  Finding a way to let go of not only the material stuff but also the psychological stuff helps free you in ways you may not have imagined or even allowed.  Holding on prevents you from moving on when all you need to do is create some much needed space to allow you to see more clearly. Changing your perspective on things helps pave the way for new job opportunities that you can’t do when your view to the future is blocked with baggage from your past.  Knowing how to clear out the unnecessary from the necessary is your first step in managing to lighten the load and to make a clear path in the road ahead.

We all have stuff from our past we want to hold onto no matter how unrealistic it is for us and when it holds no purpose towards helping us towards our future growth.  Like a warm and worn security blanket with many tattered holes, we need to know when it’s time to lay down what has served its purpose and free ourselves towards a lighter, brighter road ahead.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

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Just A Job…

Lisa Kaye - Tue, 06/03/2014 - 23:39

Giving thought to what you were put here on earth to do in the long term might hurt your brain too much to think about.  Coasting through the ether however and landing on something you like vs. what you have to do might feel like a more fluid and natural process.  Not everyone loves his or her job.  Some people might actually be good at something that they are really not that into.  Just because you have an aptitude and are successful in a chosen career path, does not mean this is what you were born to do.  Just because you have a job does not mean you are either good at what you do or bad at what you do it really just means you have a job.

Your ability to apply your unique gifts and talents in a meaningful way sets you apart from just having a job to really excelling in your job to becoming successful in your job to really loving your job.  On some level whether you admit it to yourself or not, being good at a job does not mean you love what you are doing.  It may seem like an oxymoron but one does not necessarily equate to the other. There are many folks who do what they do well because they have found a pattern a rhythm a way to do something that suits them.  This does not necessarily mean they love what they are doing.  Being good at something and being in love with something can mean the difference between what floats your boat and what just floats.

Having just a job might be what most people feel they are doing when they drive the long way into work each morning.  Looking for a new challenge and finding a way to make it through the next pay period might be all you need in order to get motivated to get to work each day. But does that make it just a job or a job you love?

You can have your cake and eat it to when it comes to designing the career that suits you. It does not mean you have to settle for something that makes you miserable.  It does mean than you should be able to pick and choose from what makes you thrilled to go to work each day from what makes your stomach turn with anguish.  Your job should not be something you just do to pay the bills as it may be for most.  Your job is something that should make you feel good about your accomplishments, your interpersonal interactions and your ability to learn, grow and contribute as part of the greater good.  Whether you are part of a start up creating the next version of virtual reality or you are an owner of a confection shop, your job should be part of your DNA not motivated by paying your electric bill.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

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Raising Your Job Bar…

Lisa Kaye - Tue, 05/27/2014 - 12:05

You may feel like you are reaching for the stars every time you set your career intentions or apply for another great job only to be turned down or ignored. It’s not like you are deliberately setting your expectations too high it’s just that you may need to lower your desire to match your expectation.  Just because you set your sights on something does not mean you should not do everything in your power to try to attain it.  Whether it’s a house, a car, a relationship or your next job, knowing what you want is half the battle between where you stand now and moving closer to what you want.

Lowering your desire to match your expectations does not mean you are settling or selling yourself short when it comes to attaining your career goals.  It means that you are setting realistic expectations and are able to manage your expectations against what you know are possible outcomes.  Having desire towards wanting to achieve something is the gas in the car to help you drive you to your next destination.  Expecting you’ll arrive there without gas is setting yourself up for disappointment and regret and an even longer walk to where you want to go.

When it comes to your career choices raising your expectations to match your desire means you are willing to look at what is not working in your job or your search and course correct until you feel you are aligning your expectations with your goals.  When your desire is strong, you have the necessary energy and will to realize any expectation you set for yourself.  Maintaining that level of uninterrupted focus and vision will help you realize your career goals even though you may become discouraged at not moving fast enough towards your goals.

Becoming who you want to be takes work.  No great work of art materializes over night. In order to achieve your own personal greatness you have to continue to visualize your dream job, your next career move with clarity and intention.  Wanting something bad enough is sometimes all it takes to move you from an okay job to your dream job. You will need to be responsive to opportunities and choices that appear in the road to your success and not question every turn with hesitation or fear. Understanding your limitations helps you realize what may be missing in your attempts to create the perfect job opportunity.

Listening to your self and believing you are capable of getting what you want may be all you need to realize your dream job.  Enthusiasm for something is contagious when you have the right attitude and are willing to engage others in helping you realize your goals.  Everyone wants to support a winner and someone they can get behind.  You have what it takes to succeed and raising your job bar to the heights of your desire is not wasting your time when you know what you want and are willing to do what it takes to get it.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

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1-2-3 Hire Me!

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 05/19/2014 - 09:36

Well it might not be as easy as 1-2-3 but keeping the interview process simple and to the point will likely help you figure out whether you have what it takes to land the perfect job.  Job interviewing like any first time encounter, needs to be direct, clear and to the point if you are going to make your first impression count.  Having a great resume or being referred by someone all help you open the door but what actually makes you walk in and take a seat may be the difference between knowing how to ace your 1-2-3’s.

You only have one shot when it comes to making a good first impression.  There are no makeovers or second chances when you are up for the role of your life.  Not to add pressure, but making a good first impression sets the stage for whether you will be called back to read for the part or likely hear the words, “Next” to give you an idea on where you stand in the interview process.

There are three simple rules to keep in mind anytime you are up for a new job or you are about to interview with someone for the first time:

  1. You Had Me At Hello:  Knowing how well you present yourself may make the first awkward moments of meeting someone knew less clunky.  How firmly you shake someone’s hand, whether you make direct eye contact and how well you hold your physical posture all are signs that you take yourself seriously and others should as well.  The first words you speak and how you address someone new all make a lasting impression when you are making your first introduction.  When you ramble on, fire away too many questions or fall into an awkward silence, you set yourself up for failure before you even begin.  Start by keeping it brief and making a strong first start instead of nervously fumbling over your self.
  2. I Robot:  Having a good script and sticking to it ensures you cover all the basis when it comes to highlighting your background and accomplishments to someone you are meeting for the first time.  Your ability to be relaxed and comfortable when talking about your self is the key to making someone notice you and not feel like you are programmed to answer on command.  Remaining calm, focused and relaxed ensures you are not going to blow a circuit if thrown a curve ball of a question and that you are able to keep up with whatever someone has to throw your way without a serious malfunction or break down.
  3. End It Like Beckman:  Making a good first impression is important but learning to end the meeting with a big finish will help you either seal the deal or kill your chances for ever getting a call back no matter how badly you think you aced the interview.  Having some set responses such as, “What are next steps in the interview process?” or “What is the best way to follow up” or perhaps, “I really enjoyed our conversation what’s the best way for me to get in touch again?” all help you to ease into the next step without sounding desperate or hard up for the job. Remember to make the interviewer feel comfortable and glad they met you and feel like they can’t wait to wash their hands after the meeting.

Learning how to follow up with a prospective job lead whether you are at the beginning or end of the interview process implies you are comfortable with change and new direction and know best how to make the most out of a new introduction even if it does not immediately yield a job offer.  Remember 1-2-3 hire me steps the next time you feel the need to trip over your own words before you even get out of the car for your interview.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

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5 Things To Avoid In A Job Interview

Lisa Kaye - Tue, 05/13/2014 - 10:08

Some of you may not always be in the interview seat and may actually be the one interviewing a prospective candidate.  Whether you are doing it as a favor to a friend or are a recruiter, or someone asked you to keep an applicant company while they are being shuffled from one interview to another, remember to put yourself in the candidate’s place and act “as if”.  We all know how nervous and intimidating the interview process can be.  Understanding that is the first step in making a candidate feel comfortable and less awkward during the rigorous interview process.

Here are some topics or actions that will likely make an already nervous job applicant see “red” or worse, run in fear before the interview even gets started.  Next time you are in front of a prospective candidate consider avoiding the following:

1.     “You are sitting in my chair!” Claiming your space during an interview may seem like a natural step for you but marking your territory with an unsuspecting candidate is likely to have them feel like they just stepped in a pile before they even sit down.  Physical and personal boundaries are important when meeting new people but rearranging people like furniture is not going to win you any high marks and will likely set the stage for a very tense first impression.

2.     “So, you’ve been married before?”  Finding ways to break the ice when meeting someone for the first time is an important first step in establishing a good rapport. Delving into their personal life and inquiring about their marital status or how often they date is not.  Finding the boundaries between “social” and “sociopath” will help you know just how close is too close for comfort.

3.     “When was the last time you had sex?”  There is probably no “good” conversation where this phrase is appropriate unless of course you are auditioning for a scene in “Masters of Sex.”  Inquiring about someone’s sexual activity is not appropriate topic of conversation for the office or in any professional setting.

4.     “How late do you like to work?”  It’s nice to know the work ethic of the prospective candidate, but inquiring as to their work preferences implies you may have a set of standards that are hard to match.  You can discuss work expectations but watch out when you want to know what time this person likes to go home and have dinner with the family.  At that point, it’s really none of your business.

5.     “Oops sorry, I farted.” It’s good to feel comfortable in your own skin, but when you are feeling a little to at ease you may miss the line between appropriate and crude.  Controlling your physical impulses to burp, fart or spit while in front of a candidate and not your family member will help you set a good example not to mention maintain self-control during the meeting.  And before you ask, yes this has happened in an interview!

We all want to make a good first impression and knowing that you are representing your employer when you meet someone new for a job means you should act as if your boss were in the room with you.  Your personal comments and actions during an interview are as important to a prospective candidate as what you may find on their resume.  It’s always good to try and make someone feel relaxed but remember making someone feel “at home” should not be taken literally.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

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Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

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10 Phrases You Should NOT Use During a Job Interview

Lisa Kaye - Tue, 05/06/2014 - 10:50

When it comes to putting your best foot forward sometimes it may feel you’ve put your foot in your mouth instead.  When we try to make a good impression on a job interview we inadvertently get nervous enough to stammer, chatter on or pick up old habits and phrases well are best left between texts among friends.  It’s hard not to wander off in conversation when you are in a job interview and feel like the questions have put you off guard or that you are taking some test where only a select few know the right answer.

There are things you say and things you don’t say when you are meeting someone for the first time and literally your job is on the line.  Job interviews are meant to be conversations about you and about the other person in a way that gets you both feeling comfortable with one another and are able to share important details about your accomplishments, work style and social skills.  Yes it is a test but not one where you need to feel “too comfortable” and let you guard down.

Next time you are in a job interview catch yourself if you find you are using one or more of these phrases in any part of the conversation because sometimes being too relaxed might not be a good thing:

1.   Will do: Ending your sentences in a phrase that denotes you will take action is fine in email but does not work when you are trying to act professionally and responsibly in a job interview conversation.

2.   For sure.  Ok I’m not sure when this over used term made it back into the daily vernacular but last time I think I heard this used was when Bevis & Butthead were popular.  There is just no appropriate place to end a sentence with this phrase in any conversation job interview or otherwise.

3.   Copy that:  Unless you are an air traffic controller or are in law enforcement, sounding like you are speaking to someone through a walkie-talkie is not a way to make the person feel engaged or understood during a conversation about you.

4.   Trending:  The world of social media is taking over “for sure” but not every conversation or subject or individual is “trending” regardless of how “in” this makes you sound.  Ideas trend, people do not.

5.    Selfie:  Yes they made it into the common language but attempting to take one of your self during a job interview would be the height of inappropriateness and believe me, it has happened!

6.    Viral:  Being enthusiastic about your accomplishments may make you want to “go viral” but it’s best to save that conversation for a medical professional and not your prospective employer.

7.    Game Changer:  Your job interview may very well be a game changer, but describing your career choices in such a way is not wise if you want to take the “d” out of drama.

8.    Chillaxin:  You may feel like you want to kick back and sip your Perrier with ease during your job interview but describing your work experience in such a way serves you better if you were applying for a job as a life guard.

9.     Man up:  Not sure where you’d use this phrase in a job interview unless you were describing your less than amicable relationship with your former boss, but showing how macho you are during an interview is probably not the best place to flex your resume.

10‘Aha” Moment:  Describing your choice to look for another job as if you found The Holy Grail is not likely to draw you any points.  Keep your true “aha moments” and self-realization exercises in private-no one really wants to know how you process your feelings.

Giving yourself permission to feel comfortable when on a job interview is one thing, acting and speaking as if you made a new “BFF” with the recruiter is another.  Keep the casual comments for your friends and brush off a few new phrases that will have you turning down job offers left and right.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

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Handle With Care

Lisa Kaye - Tue, 04/29/2014 - 11:37

We are all fragile when your job and your reputation are put to the test. Rejection, hearing “No” or not hearing a response from anyone, is common patterns in the fabric of your job search. Learning how to deal with your own feelings and understanding that this thing called a “job” happens to everyone and sometimes it’s a perfect fit and other times it’s not.  The important thing to keep in mind is that you are a central part of the process in being satisfied in your job and if you don’t take care of your emotional needs and wants first no one else will.  Remember, it’s important that you “handle with care” when you are looking for your next job.

Following all the steps like updating your resume, attending networking events and following up on good job leads are all necessary and important steps in finding your next job.  But what do you do for yourself once you get there?  How well to you handle your approach in keeping your job when you are feeling like you made the wrong choice or that you have changed and the job hasn’t?  It’s okay to evolve in your career as a mater of fact it’s an important part of your personal AND professional growth and development. Knowing when it’s time to move on and being in touch with your feelings means you are taking care of not just your resume but honoring how important your happiness is as part of the process.

Handling your feelings about your career with care takes you front and center in your search for the perfect job.  It’s not that you can’t find help or make a move without making what you want a priority.  But being clear about what you really want before you set upon the chase will help you make the right choice when you may have said “Yes” to the job offer before you thought it through.

You know what you want but honoring who you are and how you will be treated is part of any process in making sure you are not just taking care of the bank account but your personal account as well.  Most people think a job will make them happy and a healthy paycheck will answer all of their concerns.  It’s not the case.  You are the only one who can make yourself happy and if you are not happy when you embark on your job search, trust me you will be attracting the wrong opportunities to you even though it might look great from the outside.

Honoring yourself means being truthful about what makes you happy and it’s not just about where you work or whom you work for.  Although important, understanding what excites you, what inspires you and what makes you happy to drive to work is what honors who you are and what talents you have to offer a new employer.  If you don’t honor and respect yourself in your job search process, no one else likely will.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

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What’s Your Job Box?

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 04/21/2014 - 11:27

Knowing what you want to do and whom you want to do it with is not as easy as it might seem.  Some people come out of the gate knowing exactly who they want to be when they grow up and who they’d like to be with.  For the rest of us, finding out which job box you fit into maybe the missing key.  I often realized that I did not fit into any one-job box.  Not the marriage box, not the traditional employee box nor the athlete box.  I kind of created my own box along the way although I don’t think that was what I ever really set out to do.

We start out with the best of intentions, whether it’s thinking we’ll get married and have kids to longing to make a million or buy your first home.  There are milestones along the way we can celebrate but sometimes, they remind us that we might not be on the path we chose for ourselves long ago.  Maybe you had pressure to become a doctor, writer, and musician because that was what was expected of you or you are following a long-standing family tradition.  Maybe you jump from one job to another not sure which one feels right only to realize you like the idea of something new and different and have made a career out of the job-hopping process.  Finding your job box means you are willing and happy with jumping into something that fits your personality, your work habits and propels you to do great things with your talents.

It may take you some time to realize what you are good at or, you may know that you are good at many things and can’t seem to choose which career path to take.  Finding and jumping into the right job box is in itself a process where you need to be both patient and trusting of yourself.  Knowing which job box is the right one for you can be overwhelming. You may not fit neatly into any one box but like to hop-the-top so to speak of each finding pleasure in doing many things well.

No one is holding a gun to your head and asking you to choose one job over another.  You have to know what you love to do and where you see yourself doing it in order to make the right choice for you. Following your passion is one way but when that passion can’t pay the bills or won’t yield the lifestyle you envision for yourself it’s time to hop into another job box that might be a better fit.  Prioritizing your wants, desires with your passions, skills and abilities may make the process of choosing your job box easier for you when it comes time to make a change in your career.

Remember, no one-job box is right for everyone.  Knowing yourself and what you want from your job, your career and your life, is the only true test in making sure you are choosing for you and not to please someone else.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

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Catching Job Fire….

Lisa Kaye - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 00:05

Like the Hunger Games you might be ready to do battle and fight for your job survival at any cost. But how well you play the game is just as important as whether or not you are in it to win it.   Catching job fire means you are ready to take on your career game for the fight of your life.

Like any good winning champ, you’ve got to first discover what you are really good at and what makes you stand apart from your competition.  Highlighting your skills on a resume is one thing but really being a subject matter expert in your field and showcasing your accomplishments is another.  How do you do that exactly you might ask?  Well, making sure you are seen and not just heard is one way to showcase your talents to the world.

When was the last time you were asked to speak on a panel?  When did you judge a competition in your field?  When were you asked to be a keynote speaker at an industry conference?  Being your own press machine helps you promote your skills and talents to a wider audience than to just your co-workers and to your boss.  It’s good to be recognized by your peers but being acknowledged and revered by your industry is a way to know you are not just well liked but you are loved in return!

When you know what you are good at you can promote your expertise and showcase your knowledge and maybe give back a little something in return.  Even if you are not looking for your next job, realizing that you need to be seen AND heard in order for people to know who you are is important when it’s time to ratchet up your game to the next level.  Your ability to make yourself known for all the right reasons means you are able to traverse your accomplishments and skills to the next level playing field which will set you apart from all the others out there trying to do the same.

You are a master at what you do and knowing how to leverage your skills and highlight your accomplishments beyond your LinkedIn page is what the world of Facebook and Twitter is all about.  Self-promotion is the way to become the lead horse in the race to your career like no other vehicle.  We tend to think promotion is left for product-placement and brand strategy.  But when you start to think of yourself as a brand than you are making a larger connection to showcasing your talents on a whole new level.

Being good at something and getting a raise in title and compensation is one way to catch job fire.  Figuring out how to scale to the highest levels in your field is another way to show off what you have to offer and help others in your field do the same.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

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Restless Ambition

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 04/07/2014 - 21:00

There maybe times in your life when you feel you can’t move fast enough and that you’ll never get to where you want to go no matter how much you sprint.  It’s nice to have so many options rolling around your head but when it comes time to making a move do you know which direction you will take? There are those who procrastinate and find it challenging to make a decision even if it’s about what to have for breakfast in the morning let alone what to do with their career life.  Then there are those that have so many ideas, so many interests that the thought of choosing just one makes them mad!  There are ways to tame your restless ambition even if you are not sure which career is right for you.

Making a plan and sticking to it seems like a good idea when you are fresh out of school and the world is a blank page from which you can write your own story.  Then there is “life” and all that comes up in the course of a day, week, year that forces you to twist and turn with uncertainty and makes you anxious to make a career commitment.  You may have a job you love but hate the pay.  You may make tons of money but hate the work you have chosen to do.  You may long to be an entrepreneur but need to support a family.  You may wish to go it alone but work in a family business.  Whatever your ambition, you need not make the choice a stressful one no matter how restless you are to get ahead.

Managing your ambition is like maintaining self-control when the options, choices and possibilities seem endless or overwhelming. Knowing how to say “No” to what does not work and “Yes” to what feels right is the difference between knowing when too much chocolate is a bad thing. Whether you know what you want or you can’t decide, managing your expectations about the future will help you overcome feeling like the world is rushing ahead without you.

Playing catch-up with your career goals may have you looking over your shoulder at every passing opportunity in hopes of getting a second chance at success. Don’t press the panic button just yet!  If something passes you by it just means it was not right for you.  Becoming anxious over any missed opportunity will not help you get to your career goals any faster.  Being restless about your next move may make you jump into the wrong situation before you’ve had a chance to really think it through.  Moving too fast especially when you have many options to consider may cause you to make an abrupt choice in your next move towards success.

Being restless can work to your advantage in that nothing generates more opportunity for you than when you start to obsessively focus on what you want next from your career move.  Restless does not have to spell reckless when it comes to making a decision about where you want to spend the rest of your career days.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

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