Lisa Kaye

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The Career Rebel
Updated: 16 min 57 sec ago

Inside Job…

Mon, 10/13/2014 - 12:23

Your job search may feel like a hired hit, when you’ve got your target in sight but you wind up being the victim in your own game of kill or be killed. It’s not like you are the star in a Scorsese flick, but it sure feels like you will need more than a little help from the likes of Nucky Thompson when it comes to protecting your career. When your job search is starting to feel like an “inside job” you have to quickly figure out who your friends are and eliminate your enemies if you ever stand a chance at winning your next job offer.

Finding a job is as much work as keeping a job. You need to not only comb the Internet and use every opportunity available to you but you may even have to make friends with your enemies in order to get ahead. What does that mean exactly? It means you have to put down your pride, occasionally kiss butt and take prisoners if you are going to be more than just assertive in your job pursuit.

Your single most important asset when looking for your next job are the friends you keep along the way. Even if that means you don’t have many friends, it’s time you start collecting them and shore up your defenses in times of crises. Knowing the right people, no matter in what industry you are seeking work, is your biggest asset when trying to get a foot in anywhere. Yes a great resume helps, the right wardrobe can work wonders, but if you are not connecting with the best people that can help you attain your goals, than you are not doing all that it takes to get your next job.

Creating your own band of brothers’ means you are leveraging not only the network you may already have, but any new recruits you can muster up along the road as well. You may be able to get ahead with your looks or your smarts but as the song says, “You get by with a little help from my friends” never rang so true. People can make or break your chances at moving ahead. When you think you’ve got what it takes to make it, if you are not connected and aligned with the right people who are moving up, your chances of finding and securing your next job fall off considerably.

The next time you are thinking of making a career move, evaluate who you have as your hit team and create your job search the way you would an inside job, by hitting up one member of your gang after another. Knowing whom your friends are is an important part of the job search process. Don’t fall victim to thinking blind resumes and your LinkedIn network is all you need. Reach out and touch EVERYONE who is able to help you secure your next job and don’t let up until you’ve made the final score.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

Copyright © 2014 Lisa Kaye | HR | Consulting | Los Angeles | Entertainment | Human Resources | Search - The Career Rebel
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What NOT To Wear To Your Interview….

Fri, 10/03/2014 - 09:04

Dressing for success may be an overused term these days but knowing how to physically show up for an interview is as important as what is on your resume. Having the ability to know the corporate culture and environment of a workplace also helps you figure out what to wear when you are called for an in person interview. Over dressing can be as deadly as under dressing when it comes to making a good first impression. How do you know what to choose that will work for you and not make you look like you are going to the opening of an Art Gallery or the Royal Ballet?

Understanding a corporate culture is as much about what the work environment is like as well as what is and is not appropriate to wear to work. In a day wear “flip flops” are the norm in some work places, knowing how to dress for your very first interview will either make or break your chances for the job.

When in doubt follow these few simple rules when it comes to dressing up:

  1. Tie or No Tie? For men, this can be a real challenge. Even in the most casual of work environments, wearing a tie can immediately signal that you are not the right type to work at a company. If you are looking to work in technology, a creative environment or production, wearing a tie may seem too formal or that you are over-dressed for the occasion. Make sure you bring a tie with you and check out the scene in the lobby. If it looks like there are a few folks wearing ties, then by all means, slip into the men’s room and put one on. If not, best to keep it in your back pocket for another interview.
  2. Hose or no panty hose? For woman, some people are blessed with great, tan legs others need a little help. Panty hose even in the hottest days signals that you are put together and dressed. These days woman are rarely expected to wear panty hose with any outfit. Whether you choose to wear a skirt, dress or pants to an interview, having a pair of hose handy might help if you notice the environment is more formal than you expected. If not, make sure the length of your skirt is fashionable and appropriate so it does not matter whether you are wearing hose or not.
  3. No Brainers: No matter what the situation here are a few items that are NEVER appropriate in any interview situation even if the work environment is casual, these include: Flip flops, barefoot, shorts, capris, cut offs, swim trunks, graphic tee shirts, wall art, short shorts, no bra, tank top, belly risers, body piercings, overly inked forearms, good luck talismans, overly accessorized, etc. You get the picture.

When in doubt if it makes noise, does not cover your body parts and is something you would not wear in front of your grandmother or church, best to switch it for something a bit mainstream. I’m not suggesting you change your look in order to get the job offer, but toning it down particularly if you have a “fashion flair” might be more suitable. You can whip out your wears AFTER you get the job offer!

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

Copyright © 2014 Lisa Kaye | HR | Consulting | Los Angeles | Entertainment | Human Resources | Search - The Career Rebel
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Two Words: Google Yourself!

Mon, 09/29/2014 - 10:50

You may think you know who you are and how you come across to others. You’ve built a great reputation in the industry and have many unsolicited Linked In endorsements to your credit. You are often asked to speak at industry events, offered great assignments at work and let’s just say you are considered a “fan favorite “when it comes to being offered new career opportunities without so much as lifting a resume. That may all be well and good and congratulations for coming so far in your career. However, do you really have a handle on how the world out there views you?

There is one very over looked area of your career that can make the mightiest of you tumble without so much as a warning. When it comes to really making sure you put your best professional foot forward one question comes to mind, “Do you Google yourself?” It’s not like you are so self-obsessed you are wondering what the rest of the world may think of you and every given minute. As much as you may think you don’t have to worry abut being confused by the other person sharing your same name and professional groups, it might not be a bad idea to make sure you at least know who you are being compared to when it comes to being checked out before you even interview for the job.

Not long ago I tried this myself and was surprised to see what came up. To my surprise “Lisa Kaye” was also a 23- year old Clique model brandishing a little more than a string bikini in most photos. Not that I would mind others confusing me for that Lisa Kaye, but when you are trying to build a professional reputation, looks count. Being prepared by knowing how your web profile appears is not a bad thing when it comes to the invisible world of the Internet and the things you think you have no control over but you do. If you find that you have googled yourself and you don’t appear anywhere that is another piece of information to help you better brand, market and highlight who you are in your profession lest you be completely forgotten. As much as you may be concerned about whom you are compared with, not being compared to anyone or not showing up at all is just as big a problem for your professional career as being compared to the wrong person.

It’s good to know you are liked and respected by those in the profession who know you. But for those who do not, making sure you button up the other parts of your professional life by ensuring that your Google profile ranks you in the way you want to be represented is an important factor. If you think that no one will check you out before they meet you for an interview or meeting, guess again. Just as important as making sure your Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram or Twitter profiles represent you well, you need to be mindful that we live in an age where anyone could know everything about someone they have not even met in the tap of a key stroke!

Making sure your online presence maps to your resume is something to keep in mind and not take for granted. It’s a good rule of thumb to check your profile and search your name and industry to see what comes up to make sure you are not only in the best of company but that the information in the world wide web is accurate and concise. Finding a job and making sure your reputation remains in tact may not have been something they taught you when you were first applying for jobs, but it’s the new age common sense when it comes to making sure you are who you say you are and not someone else.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

Copyright © 2014 Lisa Kaye | HR | Consulting | Los Angeles | Entertainment | Human Resources | Search - The Career Rebel
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5 Things To Ask BEFORE You Accept The Job…..

Tue, 09/23/2014 - 10:22

We all want to make the best decision when it comes to our career choice that sometimes we are willing to overlook the obvious. In our excitement and sheer delight, we accept any and all conditions of employment as part of the job offer without hesitation. This is not a one-sided negotiation. When it comes to accepting a job offer, here are a few things you should think about and ask BEFORE you sign on the dotted line:

  1. How does Compensation work? You may be so caught up in the fact that you are earning more with the new job, that you do little to inquire about how the company’s future compensation system works. How often do you receive raises? What are the merits or parameters for additional increases? What does the bonus opportunity look like? Is there equity? How do you move from one pay grade to another?   Some people shy away from discussing compensation even after they have received an offer because they think it’s bad form. It’s naïve of you if you DO NOT ask about compensation after you have expressed interest in the job and before you accept a formal job offer. If there is room to negotiate, it’s before you start your job not once you are in it.
  2. Upward Mobility: What are your chances for advancement? What happened to the other person in the job assuming you replaced someone and this is not a new position? How are promotions and advancement in the company treated? Your ability to not only accept your current job but also think towards the future is important if you want to get ahead. Knowing how the company treats employees once they are hired vs. being in the job for many years is a sign on how well you will be treated. The last thing you want is to go into a dead-end job or wind up in a worse situation than the one you may be leaving. Think ahead.
  3. Company Culture: Equally as important as the duties of your job are the conditions which define the company’s corporate culture. Do they have a formal or informal dress code? Does the company provide meals to employees? How are the benefits valued? Do they allow dogs to work? What is the communication style and how well do they communicate to staff? Are there formal work systems in place or is it open and non-structured? Knowing how the company operates before you say, “Yes” will help you manage and navigate the company better than hoping and praying you will just fit in.
  4. Communication: Whether formal or informal, knowing how well the company communicates internal and external businesses is crucial to your ability to succeed in your position no matter what level you are in. Does the company have an open communication plan, regular Town Hall meetings, posting updates on Wiki’s or just having an “open door” policy on being able to express concerns or ideas, are all important to know ahead of time before you accept a job offer. Healthy communication of the lack of it can really dampen an otherwise great work experience. Get your company’s report card before you accept the job offer.
  5. Organizational Structure: Understanding and knowing who reports to whom and how the company is set up not only in your department but in the rest of the company is helpful to you on many levels. Understanding the lay of the land will help you to know how workflow is managed, who has approval authority and how the lines of expertise and communication are drawn. Understanding not only the make-up of your department but the names and positions of your co-workers, helps you to not only assimilate quicker, but gives you a better understanding of how the company manages its lines of businesses and where you fit into that equation.

Being prepared when you start your job will not only help you have a stronger foot hold in your new job, but will help you manage and grow your career in a more insightful way.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

Copyright © 2014 Lisa Kaye | HR | Consulting | Los Angeles | Entertainment | Human Resources | Search - The Career Rebel
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This Is Where I Quit….

Tue, 09/16/2014 - 09:30

You may have days where you think the job you are in is the right job, right now and you can walk at any time with little or no provocation. You may love your job some days and you may be waiting for the phone to ring hoping your next best offer is just around the desk waiting for you to take a leap of faith. When the job you love no longer loves you do you have what it takes to just quit? No one likes to feel like jumping ship is the best option. But, when you’ve tried all you can and you know this is not where you want to be, do you ask yourself, “Is this where I quit?”

Finding work life balance may be one issue that is making you second-guess your career choices. Being passed over time and again for a promotion or raise when your co-workers fly up the corporate ladder of success may be yet another. You may have thought it would be a lot easier for you by now to get what you wanted from your job or your career only to find that the road was much harder than you imagined. If you had to do it again, would you choose your current career path or would you go another way? Finding and keeping the right job is not as easy as it use to be especially as personal and professional pressures continue to mount.

You may have a family to support, kids in college or aging parents who depend on you for financial assistance. Pressures will always be there pulling you in one direction or another, but when the job just becomes a means to pay the bills you know you have to start thinking about other options. You may feel you have no options and that all you need to do is keep the pipeline moving with cash and the world will be a better place. Getting stuck in a rut when it comes to paying bills and staying in a job you hate can be overwhelming and well at times paralyzing.

Creating options for yourself can be as simple as going to lunch once a week with a different colleague and exploring what other companies are doing and how you might fit into their plans. Keeping up on all that’s happening in your world outside your company may ensure some hope when you think you have nothing more than what is in front of you today. You may decide to take side consulting jobs while keeping your full time job in an effort to break out of a pattern of misery and offer you a way to earn extra money doing something you love.

Walking away from a job is never easy but making a conscious decision that the job you are in no longer works for you is important step to ensure your long-term happiness and success. It might not always be a bed of roses at the office, but knowing when it’s time to quit something that quit you a long time ago takes courage and guts and makes you see that the working world can be more than a means to an end-it can be the beginning of a world of professional success.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

Copyright © 2014 Lisa Kaye | HR | Consulting | Los Angeles | Entertainment | Human Resources | Search - The Career Rebel
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The Number One Thing You Can Do To Get a Job….

Mon, 09/08/2014 - 10:22

In the land of what to do when it comes to your career you have many choices. You can be aggressive about sending out your resume to anyone and everyone who would have a look. You could network your butt off with anyone and everyone who will speak with you. You can attend every networking event, industry mixer or meet-up group until everyone knows you by your first name. But there is one thing and really only one thing you can do that will hands down guarantee your success no matter what the job, what your job level and how many interviews you are lucky to snare.

The only thing you need to be not just good at but GREAT at is your ability to – wait for it- “FOLLOW UP!” Yes, you heard it hear first. You can do just about anything well, your resume could be a work of art, your network can be the envy of your friends but guarantee if you do not know how to follow up on a job lead, an interview and even a thank-you, your chances for success drop down significantly in your search for the perfect job.

Following up is often an underestimated skill not everyone has the ability to master. Whether it’s you ability to follow up on work tasks, or personal chores in a way that ensures you can check them off your list once and for all, the need to be great at following up when it comes to your career is no less important and may be what makes or breaks you when it comes to landing your next job offer. You are good at so many things but those who don’t or choose not to follow up are setting themselves up for great disappointment when it comes to making sure you are in line for a great job opportunity.

It’s okay if you are not qualified for a job you interview for. But do you know what else is out there if you don’t send a note, follow up on a job lead or even “ask” someone with a follow up question what else they may know of? Having an arsenal of follow up questions, comments and tactics ensures that you know how to master not only the job interview but what comes after as that is sometimes more important than making the initial connection. Sending someone a thank you note after an interview, following up a few weeks after you met with someone, making sure the people you meet or have recently been introduced to you remember you weeks or months later, are all good steps to ensure you are appropriately following up. Even if you meet someone and there isn’t a right opportunity for you at that moment in time, following up with them does not mean you are being a pest or annoying, it means that you are keeping them front of mind and that you have the sense to know there maybe something there if you are just a little patient.

Following up is really having a good dose of common sense. There is no other way to put it. Following up shows a level of professional etiquette that you either have or you lack but can make the difference if someone remembers you or not. Following up with someone about your career is not a boring or bothersome chore, it is practical business keeping if you are to succeed in business or in finding your next job no matter how many interviews you have been on.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

Copyright © 2014 Lisa Kaye | HR | Consulting | Los Angeles | Entertainment | Human Resources | Search - The Career Rebel
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“My Career’s Not Dead, It’s Just Resting…”

Tue, 09/02/2014 - 22:06

It’s the end of the summer and as the kids are heading back to school, the traffic grinds to a slow crawl and the stores are packing it in with Halloween candy. You are reminded that the end of the summer does not mean the end of your job search. The war continues to wage on as you may have taken the summer off to enjoy some much needed R&R with friends and family, but it does not mean you are dead if you have not landed your next job. Consider this summer your career resting post – it’s okay to take a rest for awhile.

The summer is a time to relax-no really it is. No matter whether you live in the forever summer state of California or somewhere in the North East, summer denotes a time of relaxation, reflection and oh yes bug spray. If you are feeling guilty about not putting the pedal to the metal with your job search over the summer months- stop beating yourself up! September is a perfect time to regroup, rethink and re-engage your job search before the first snowflakes suddenly appear.

  1. Make a Plan: Even if you have no clue what to do or where to begin, enlist the help of a trusted friend or hire a professional. Mapping out your career direction may not land you the perfect job, but it will give you hope that there are opportunities out there that you may not have thought of before.  Making a plan may seem like a waste of time, but while you wipe that sun tan lotion off from your last soak of  summer, remember, thinking about your next job move no matter how far out there is NOT a waste of time. You have to start somewhere.
  2. Reach Out and Touch Someone: You may think you were raised with great manners and a sense of professionalism that sets you apart from the rest of the hopelessly unemployed. Making sure you not only “thank” anyone and everyone who may have made an introduction, sent an email on your behalf or even accepted your LinkedIn request, means you are able to share some acknowledgement to those who matter. Having common professional courtesy does not mean you have to bribe your way to the top with gifts of tickets to the US Open. Being professionally courteous and being grateful and thankful to those who have or will help you along the way  with your job search, ensures that you will remain front of mind when a friend or colleague hears about the next, best opportunity that’s right for you.
  3. Ask and You Shall Receive: Nothing is easier than to help someone who knows exactly what they want, whether it’s an introduction to a company, or to an individual or to participate in a networking event. Being clear on your objective, even if you are not sure on what the job is, will help others help you in a way that is positive and meaningful to both of you. You will never know about the job, event, or individual who may be the next step to your future job if you don’t figure out a way to ask for help from those who are in a position to offer it to you. No one is suggesting you “beg” for your next job, but inquiring about new leads, contacts, events or even volunteering opportunities that will connect you to the right people is not a waste of time, it makes for smart business.

So long as you keep moving towards your career goal no matter how insignificant the steps may seem means you are far from dead in the career water-it means you are wading and resting through your options towards your next big, career win.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

Copyright © 2014 Lisa Kaye | HR | Consulting | Los Angeles | Entertainment | Human Resources | Search - The Career Rebel
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3 Reasons To Say “No” At Work …

Mon, 08/25/2014 - 11:02

When you are tired and you just can’t take it anymore do you give yourself permission to disconnect? Whether it’s from your job, your family, or from your computer, learning how to say “No” when you are not feeling it is vital step in honoring who and what you are no matter how tempting the invitation to “join in” may sound.

You may like to please others more than you like to please yourself but learning when and how to put up the boundaries at work will save you not only time, but your sanity when the going gets even too tough for you. The next times you feel compelled to say, “Yes” but are stopped in your tracks, think about what is motivating you and respond accordingly.

  1. It’s Not Your Job. Knowing when it’s appropriate to be a “team player” and pitch in and knowing when you are being asked to stretch well beyond your limits signals a time when it may be okay to just say “No”. It’s not that you are trying to be insubordinate or problematic, but knowing that you are working and focusing your attention on the job you were hired to do does not mean you are a traitor when you are being asked to do twenty other things that will take you off your game. Saying no to handling extra work assignments or pitching in on a regular basis to help out a co-worker will prove to be your down fall if you don’t know when and decline in a way that does not alienate your team mates and piss off your overly demanding boss. Outlining your job priorities when asked to take on extra work means you are open to considering it but need to find something else to give up if you are truly needed to pitch in elsewhere. Don’t over extend your self to the point of no return. It’s okay to say you can’t handle more work if you really can’t- you are not a slacker if you can’t.
  2. Trying To Impress: We all want to make a good impression at work whether you are up for that promotion or just a new kid on the scene trying to score some points with the powers that be. You are up for a challenge just like the next person but when your sole motivation is to impress regardless of how much work you are piling on, maybe it’s time to rethink your priorities. Raising your hand and volunteering for everything and anything does not mean you are a team player and a rock star at work. What it does mean is that you either have too much time on your hands, or you are not sticking to the job you were hired to do. Make sure you understand the scope of what you are volunteering to help out with and whether earning a few more brownie points is worth the stress and aggravation that may come from your inability to say no to the next new thing that comes your way. You can be impressive without being oppressive.
  3. It’s Not in Your DNA: Some people just don’t have it in them and say “Yes” to everything feeling like they will a disappointment or will be left out of the mix. Crowd pleasing is one think but saying “No” does not mean you are retreating, It does mean you have enough common sense to know when and how to expend your energy and resources so you maintain a high level of consistent job performance without stretching yourself too thin. It may take practice, but there is nothing wrong with declining an offer that extends your limits even if that includes after work drinks with the team or taking on extra assignments when your plate is already too full. Knowing when to balance your wants with others asks is the first step in gaining confidence and learning an artful way to decline an invitation without offending anyone.

You don’t need to be a martyr when it comes to sacrificing what’s good for you vs. what’s good for the crowd especially if all you are craving is a bit of down town to recharge the batteries. If you are not able to stand up for your self and your own needs and what makes sense for you without feeling like you are letting everyone down, then you will likely run a ground and peter out way before it’s time to raise a glass to toast anyone’s success let alone your own.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

Copyright © 2014 Lisa Kaye | HR | Consulting | Los Angeles | Entertainment | Human Resources | Search - The Career Rebel
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5 Ways To Negotiate A Job Offer or Raise….

Mon, 08/18/2014 - 11:11

Whether you need to sharpen your skills to negotiate a job offer, a promotion or a raise, knowing how to ask for what you want may not come easy for some. You may have learned from an early age the best way to ask for what you want came when you completed a chore or a task. You may have also discovered that the ultimate decision was left in the hands of your parents, teachers or guardians. Feeling that your destiny is not in your control and that from a young age you needed to learn other ways to boost your confidence and adapt survival skills if you wanted to move ahead.

It may be hard to know how and when to ask for something for fear you may alienate your friends, bosses or co-workers. It’s time to learn to stand up for what you want and here are a few ideas to keep in mind that may prove to help you along the way:

  1. You Deserve It. Nothing screams confidence more than knowing what you are worth and standing up to make sure you are compensated for it. If you are in a job you love but feel you are getting less than you deserve, do your homework and find out what the rest of the world thinks. Going on informational interviews to see what other companies pay for your skill set is not a sign that you are not being loyal to your boss. Doing some market research online to understand what your compensation range should be signals you are aware of how your position is valued on the open market and if you are performing at the desired level, maybe it’s time to have a little talk with your boss to determine the best way to navigate a raise.
  2. Know Your Facts: No one wants to feel like they are being put on the defensive when it comes to negotiating a job offer or a salary raise. Besides, the person in the position of your boss or hiring manager may not be the final decision maker when it comes to approving your request. Making your request known by stating the facts based on your research which should include, market salary data, comparable position ranges, years of experience and education should be used to build your case. You should not discuss what your peers make, what your boss makes or any other confidential information that you may have gotten access to and try to use to your advantage as it will NOT help your case.
  3. Engage Support Everyone likes to help someone they believe and trust in even if they have no control over the final decision. Learning how to build your allies and support network actually does come in handy when it comes to your ability to negotiate for yourself. Making sure you have the best offense enables you to move towards your desired goal whether it’s a job offer or a raise. Having others on your side that can speak on your behalf and support you sends the message that others think you are a valued member of the team.
  4. Keep it Simple: Don’t over complicate your negotiation by making demands that are unreasonable or make you appear greedy. We all want what we are worth but make sure you have no more than three (3) asks in a negotiation and that you are clear on the priority and importance of those asks otherwise you may lose credibility. Not getting caught in the details and having a clear plan of action and specific goals, i.e., title, salary increase, timing, etc. helps you move through the negotiation process with ease and confidence.
  5. Seal the Deal: You may get so caught up in the tactics or the details of the negotiation that you forget to close the deal and come to a conclusion! Remember any good negotiation ends with both sides feeling good about the results. Make sure you allow yourself time to do the dance but remember to close the deal and accept the offer one way or another. Leaving the deal hanging whether you are thinking about a job offer or timing of a raise or promotion should not make or break the deal for you. Close the deal even if you don’t get 100% of what you want on the first shot keeps the game fair and room for you to come back again in the future.

Negotiation does not have to be a painful process. It’s a dance and you are either the choreographer or the principle dancer. Knowing your part and learning the rules of engagement helps you to ask for and get what you want no matter how absurd the demand.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

Copyright © 2014 Lisa Kaye | HR | Consulting | Los Angeles | Entertainment | Human Resources | Search - The Career Rebel
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3 Reasons It’s Time To Quit Your Job…

Mon, 08/11/2014 - 10:08

We all have those days when we just think we can’t take any more criticism, phone into one more conference call or just make that endless drive into the office. It’s not that you have any issue with working it’s just that you didn’t sign up for the nonsense that has become your every day job life. It’s a little like the movie “Groundhog’s Day” when each time you hope for a different outcome you get the same predictable results.

Quitting your job may not be an option, but challenging yourself to know when it’s time to make a change may be a first step in knowing when it’s time to move on.

  1. Boredom You may be good at what you do you may even like what you do, but when you are no longer challenged by what you do it might be a sign it’s time for a change. No one is saying you need to make each day of your job like a competition or a great race to the finish line. But learning, growing and being challenged by new and different ways to think and apply your skills is necessary if you want to keep your brain from going dark. Making sure you stay alert to new business applications, new methods of work and understanding that you are as good as your last big project, all are signs that it’s time to look elsewhere if your current work environment does not offer up those opportunities.
  2. Your Boss: You may love your boss you may hate your boss but can you remember the reason you took the job in the first place? The people we work for and we work with are as important a part of the job landscape as the work you have chosen to do. Like a marriage or any committed relationship, your boss or co-workers make up your job family. You may not always see eye to eye and like any good family dynamic, you have a whole host of characters and personalities you have to manage. But the fact is, you need to decide whether the relationship is worth saving or, when it’s just time for a professional divorce. Making that decision after you have tried to patch up any disagreements is not always easy especially if you like the company and you like the work. Before you decide to pack your bags and end your job marriage over irreconcilable differences, make sure you have given it your best shot and you have no regrets about making the break. Breaking up may be hard to do but turning back may be impossible.
  3. It’s Always About Money: Whether you think you are compensated well or just well enough, feeling appreciated in your job is not always taken care of with a pat on the back or an employee of the month award. In our society, one measure of success is determined by the amount of compensation you receive as an employee and the value that dollar amount signifies. Money is not a dirty word and you should not feel badly if you think you are shallow because you are motivated by money. It’s not always right and it’s not always fair but learning to stand up for yourself in terms of compensation and fair pay plays a big part in whether it’s time to move on from your current job or simply ask for a raise.

You know better than anyone when the job you love no longer loves you. It’s always hard to break up with someone or something but learning to take care of yourself and your needs is not a selfish act when it comes to your career survival. Self-preservation and your own sanity should be driving you to make the right choices when it comes to your next career move. Something to think about when you are stuck in traffic.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

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5 Things That Drive A Recruiter Crazy…

Sun, 08/03/2014 - 12:58

When it comes to making a good first impression do you tend to “over compensate” and push too hard? Listen it’s hard to know how you should behave to a total stranger especially one who has the power to get you your next job. Knowing how to act and knowing what drives recruiters crazy is the first step to not making it your last step when you show up for an interview.

Next time you find yourself in front of a perfect stranger who has your career in the palm of their hands here are a few things to avoid if you want them to ever call you back:

  1. Fidget & Fuss: We all get nervous especially on an interview for a job you really want. But acting like you can’t hold it together is not going to score any real points with the recruiter. Shifting in your chair, biting your nails, playing with your hair or an object, chewing gum are all signs that you are not able to act and behave professionally when under pressure. You are being judged for your professionalism as well as your skills so remember when interviewing for the part you better learn how to act the part first.
  2. Sweaty Hands: Some people just naturally sweat and some people take it to an art form especially when they are nervous. No one likes to shake a wet towel and then have to wipe their hands off on their clothes afterwards. If you are one of those that have to wring your hands (and feet) from sweaty glands, you can try a little trick before you are introduced to a recruiter. Try carrying small can of deodorant spray or wipes in your pocket and gingerly apply a small amount to your hands. Avoid using powder or dry deodorant as they leave a sticky feeling and white residue that will likely get all over the recruiter’s hands. Alcohol wipes or Purell also act as a drying agent if you have room to carry them. Remember dry before you apply.
  3. “You Think I’ll Get The Job?” Asking the recruiter about your chances before you even get through the first interview shows you are too eager and maybe just a little desperate – no one wants to be harassed! You may want to know about your chances and how well you stack up against the other candidates but best to save that for a follow up email or the next round of interviews assuming you get a call back. Don’t be too pushy or forceful please learn to play it cool.
  4. “Do You Have Any Questions? When asked if you have any questions either about the job or the company, don’t sit there with a blank stare or simply state, “Nope, I got it!” The recruiter does not want to be the only one talking and asking questions and it’s good to show you did your homework before you came in for an interview. Being prepared with a few questions, even if they are general ones, shows that you have given the process some thought and that you are interested in the company and knowledgeable about its products and services. Staring down the recruiter should not be your only response.
  5. “How much?” We all want to be paid fairly for work but putting the recruiter on the spot about salary and compensation in a first meeting may not be the right approach. If you are asked about your compensation requirements be honest and tell them what you are currently making or, that you did some research and would like a salary between a specific range. It’s best if you do not initiate conversation about salary unless asked on a first meeting or you will likely put the recruiter on the spot as they sometimes are not fully aware of the budget or range. Trust me, if they like you, they will make the compensation work for you-wait until you are asked.

Making sure you make the best first impression means you are aware of how you come across in making the interviewer feel comfortable and relaxed. That doesn’t mean you should pull out pictures of your family vacation, but learning to read the queues and keeping it professional will ensure you at least a follow up interview if not a job offer.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

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Tats & Views…

Sat, 07/26/2014 - 10:45

So you think everyone has a keen appreciation for the multi-colored art you have displayed on your inner thigh or your forearm? It’s not like anyone would dare say a nasty comment about the word “Mother” tattooed on your hand? When it comes to art what do people know anyway. Judged or be judged? Not when it comes to your interview. Think again Picasso…

You may like what you wear, your piercings or the multitude of graffiti art proudly displayed on your body but chances are not everyone has your same level of appreciation or taste. So when it comes to “dressing” the part, how do you navigate the sterile waters of interview land when you are covered in tats way down to your toes? Knowing your audience no matter what job you are applying for means making sure you don’t give up your individuality for professionalism no matter how artfully you are decked out. When the world of tats and views collide here are a few things to remember.

  1. Do Your Homework: If you are thinking of applying for a position in a company where the culture resembles a laboratory, think about what you should wear to the interview before you show up all covered in ink. No one is asking you to change who you are or what defines you. But knowing that others may or may not have the same level of appreciation for your image might make it hard to break the barrier to entry when all you are trying to do is get a job. Hey, even Cher has to cover the ink for a part in a movie-so think of it as your audition.
  2. Keep It Simple: When in doubt about whom you are meeting or the work environment best advice is to keep it simple. This means save all the jewelry, chains, metal and accouterment for the clubs or your casual look and try to package your wear in something more main stream and toned down. No one wants to cramp your style but less is more when you don’t know who is on the other end of the interview judging you before they even look at your resume or portfolio. Be smart about your choices.
  3. Don’t Take It Personal: Keeping your demeanor as professional as possible during an interview speaks volumes to who you are as an individual and how well you present yourself to someone you just met. Not everyone will like you no matter how well you come across so no point in trying to manipulate the situation to your advantage. Being yourself means honoring who you are and what you stand for. Flaunting yourself no matter how minimal shows a lack of respect for the other person and makes people feel uneasy. Remember, not everyone has your taste level so don’t make someone feel bad because you are picking up a vibe that makes you feel uncomfortable. When in doubt remember it’s not personal it’s business.

You are your own person and you should not change for anyone. Choosing a company culture that embrace that philosophy will help you target a place where you want to work. Making sure you understand that not everyone is looking at you in the same way you see yourself helps you to anticipate how to act during an interview meeting. Becoming self-aware helps you manage first encounters and shows you are insightful. First impressions do count so make the most out of yours by dressing the part and knowing your lines.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

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Interviewing For Your Job…

Mon, 07/21/2014 - 09:11

It might provide some peace of mind when you think you have it all and that you are nice and comfy in your current job with nothing to worry about. Just because you get a steady paycheck, have been temping in a job for a year or more or are liked by the powers that be, does not guarantee you’ve got the job in the bag. Interviewing for your job means you may have still to audition for the part just when you think the casting call is over.

Having the inside track on a position when you are currently working for the company of your dreams does not always guarantee success. Finding and keeping a job is never a sure thing not when situations out of your control at work change the dynamics of the workplace and you are caught in the middle of a game of hide and seek. You are always on the spot when it comes to keeping your job. Remember there are no guarantees that you are the one they want even if you are busting your butt at work to prove yourself to those that matter most, the decision makers. Situations come and go and people change their minds as it relates to who they want to hire for a particular position.

If you have your sights set on landing and keeping a job, remember there are a few things to keep in mind when you are asked to interview for a job you were sure was yours in the first place:

  1. Assessing the Competition: Who are you competing against? What is it about your skills vs. someone else’s that are better or worse in comparison? Understanding who you are competing against and what the hiring powers are looking for in a candidates will help you position yourself for success when it comes to being considered for a job you thought you already had.
  2. Managing Your Expectations: Everyone wants to be liked and valued in what they do and working and interviewing for a job is no exception. But knowing that there are some things that are out of your control helps you to manage your perception on your candidacy for a position even though you think it’s a slam-dunk and you are the perfect person for the job. Keeping your expectations in check means you are level headed about your situation and will be confident about how you are likely to interview for the job when asked.
  3. It’s Not Personal: As much as it feels like you are entering a beauty contest when it comes to managing your job expectations, learning how to make it less personal and to keep it professional will help you to keep the feedback objective. If you are not sure why you were passed over, it was probably less likely about how you look or spoke and more about the person involved in making the hiring decision. Keep it professional remember it’s not about a popularity contest.

When it comes to wanting to impress someone you work with or who is making a hiring decision that involves you, make sure you are positioning yourself in the best way possible. Surround yourself with allies and people who support your work and are not afraid to speak up on your behalf and you will be one step closer to keeping the job of your dreams in place even though you may not have thought you had to fight for it.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

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7 Things NOT To Do In An Interview…

Sun, 07/13/2014 - 13:58

Well you got the call and you are finally set up to meet with a team of people at the company you’ve been dying to work for. Maybe you just lost your job, maybe you quit unexpectedly because you could not take it, or, like some you keep knocking on every door hoping someone will answer. You are not alone. It’s hard to figure out what will and won’t work when you are meeting new people for the first time. Perhaps someone refers you for the job that is high up in the organization like the CEO and the position you are applying for is an entry level one-how do you position yourself? Or, you could have a friend or relative in the company that put in a good word for you, how much do you leverage your connections for the right opportunity? When it comes to meeting people for the first time on an interview, how much is too much information and what can help or hurt you land the job?

When it comes to making a good impression though, here are a few things to consider when you finally do get your interview and want to really impress the hiring team:

  1. “I’m sure I can figure it out?” When it comes to describing what your skill level is and what systems or processes you are familiar with it’s best to be honest and not try to impress someone for the sake of it. Your skills are one of many professional attributes you possess that are important to a hiring manager. Understanding and presenting yourself accurately is key when asked about skills you may not have. Telling a hiring manager you can figure it out does not leave anyone with a sense of confidence that you can master the skills for the job. Shoot straight and tell it like it is when it comes to describing what you know.
  2. “It’ not personal”: So you maybe lucky enough to know the right people but flaunting your relationship with a senior member of the company is not the way to impress the hiring team. Remember, these folks likely report to or work for the top gun. Your relationship whether real or imagined may threaten folks you are meeting with. Describing your relationship with the person who may have referred you for the job as “personal” rather than “professional” send out all the wrong signals and puts everyone who meets you in an uneasy position. Keep your personal and professional boundaries apart and be clear you are not there to forge a personal connection you are there because you want the job.
  3. “Wink & rub”: Responding to a question or comment posed by the interviewer with a “wink and rub” of the hand is not an appropriate gesture if you want to be taken seriously in an interview. You may have some good skills, but knowing how to present yourself in a professional manner will help you land the job you want and not offend the people you may work with. Touching, winking or giggling should be saved for a date and not an interview.
  4. “Sending gifts,” You may think it’s a courteous gesture to thank someone for interviewing you. No one likes it when you send chocolates, flowers or balloons to the interview team and thank them for interviewing you for the job. Bottom line, it’s viewed as “bribery” no matter how insignificant the size of the gift. Sending a follow up email, note or letter is a much more appropriate response to saying “thank you” than a Starbucks’ gift card.
  5. Trying too hard: Answering every response with “I can do that” is not a way to reassure a hiring manager that you know what you are talking about. You may be eager to please but being too eager is a sign of desperation and not of someone who wants to pitch in and be a team member. Being direct about what you can and can’t do on an interview gains you far more points that trying to be a pleaser.
  6. Doesn’t be a groupie: Everyone wants to interview someone who is interested in the company and the people who work there. But don’t feel the need to recite the entire employee directory for the company. You will likely come off as a stalker or a groupie rather than someone who is in the know and has done your homework. Underplay your relationships and talk about the company and its products and services if you want to impress someone with your knowledge rather than recite the employee listing.
  7. Chewing, biting & crunching: The only thing that should come out of your mouth on an interview is your words and not what you are eating. Chewing gum (no matter how delicately you chew), biting your lips or crunching on candy are all distractions to the interviewer and are really not appropriate during an interview. If you are thirsty ask for water don’t consume a small meal.
  8. “The color of Halle Berry’s skin please” And when someone DOES offer you a drink whether it is water or coffee (best to ask for water it’s less complicated) don’t be cute enough to describe how you like your coffee as the skin color preference of a major celebrity. It might be cute in a coffee shop, but it certainly doesn’t win you over with a recruiter whose probably got ten more candidates lined up after you and has to try to figure out the complexion of Halle Berry’s skin tone! Not cute or cool under any circumstance.

Remember, first impressions count and you do only have one shot to make it stick. Make sure you don’t say or do anything that will make you appear less than qualified for a job you really want. You are what you say and what you do in an interview so make sure the lasting impression you leave is not something they will talk or tweet about once you leave. If you want a call back, act like a star not a starlet!

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

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10 Overused Resume Terms

Tue, 07/08/2014 - 01:17

Making it to the interview stage may seem like a long, endless journey with you not knowing how it will end up. You may get a job offer, you may be passed over for the job or you may just feel like it’s not the right match. It might feel great when you get the call and they want to set you up for an interview but do you ask yourself how you even got that far? It may have been through an introduction or it may just have been the compelling words on your resume whatever the reason knowing what terms or phrases to avoid on your resume might help you get one step closer to landing the perfect job.

What does your resume really say about you?   If you ever wondered what works and what does not work when it comes to impressing someone you don’t even know here are a few “overused” words and phrases that you might consider eliminating from your resume if you want even a fighting chance at nailing the next job interview:

  1. Thought Leader: When it comes to describing your leadership qualities and those you may admire in others, using this phrase to highlight your ability to be both thoughtful and a leader in one phrase seems over reaching and not a great way to explain how you truly think, feel and lead.
  2. Thinking Outside The Box: Depending on whose box you are thinking “in” or “out” of may not be to your advantage when you are trying to explain how “creative” a thinker you really are. Best to think of another way that bests describe your ability to be innovative by citing a few key business examples rather than overusing a phrase that really isn’t very original to begin with.
  3. Strategic Thinker: Much like being a thought leader being strategic is not something you need to think too much about if you are truly “strategic”. Showing someone how strategic you are is always about highlighting your professional results and not merely declaring you are able to think or act strategically. You need to prove it in order to convince someone else that you are strategic.
  4. Results Oriented: Your orientation towards results is a given if you are good at what you do. Stating that fact is one thing but highlighting your accomplishments and the way your results increased profitability for the company is another. Show me the money and we’ll show you results.
  5. Highly Motivated: You may be motivated by your work and your ambition to succeed but telling someone you don’t know in your resume about your motivations is not necessarily going to win you any extra points. Let’s put it this way, one would hope you are motivated, no need to pronounce it as some professional revelation.
  6. Change Agent: Not everyone likes change. Change for change sake is not necessarily something you need to brag about. Being an agent of change implies you can make things happen. Just be careful that your agent status does not make you seem like you are a security breach or a career operative.
  7. Dynamic: Being a dynamo is great when you are setting up a dating profile but describing yourself that way in a work situation is not necessarily the way to get the support of others. Describing yourself as “dynamic” is great if you are trying out for a professional soccer league.
  8. Bottom Line: When describing your skills like a balance sheet be careful not to make yourself appear to be so goal oriented that you miss the big picture. Being able to relate to the people in your professional circle the way you can manage your departmental budget takes more skill than being a bottom line bouncer.
  9. Best in Class: This might work for entry into a “dog show” competition but not when you are trying to explain how great you are as it relates to your professional skills. Save the “best in” for a beauty contest and not your resume.
  10. Team Player: This phrase may have meaning when watching the World Cup but when you talk about how well you play with others in the workplace, it’s not necessary to let everyone know you can and will play nicely with other employees if your job depended on it.

Making sure you represent yourself in person as well as you do on your resume should not be considered an art form, but should take more than just common sense when you make an effort to stand out.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

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Job Independence

Mon, 06/30/2014 - 11:51

Job Independence simply stated comes from never having to be a slave to your work.  Whether that implies you are content being self-employed, not employed or a long timer at a job, your independence comes from calling your own shots and never having to feel restricted by anyone or anything.

You may think job freedom is a luxury for the rich or the famous and would not apply to you.  Think again.  Creating a career where you have the freedom to choose is your first step towards true emancipation.  Having the ability to decide what type of job you want and whether the one you have is good enough opens the gates to allow you to walk in or walk out of any job situation that may not be right for you.  Your career freedom comes from being able to pick and choose and from knowing that you can celebrate your job freedom by not working and going to school if that’s what you decide.

There are many people around the world who do not have the freedom of choice whether it’s in their job, their home or in their relationships. Realizing that you live in a time where flexibility, fluidity and the fact you can call your own shots is an honored tradition, gives you the courage and ability to take leaps where you may not have dared to jump before.

What does true Job Independence mean to you?  How do you value your ability to be free when it comes to your career choices and do you take full advantage of your options? As you move into 4th of July celebration mode, ask yourself a few questions to determine whether you truly possess job independence:

  1. Can I walk away at any time?:  Knowing that you are not trapped by your circumstances means you have a good sense of freedom when it comes to moving out  of a job that you no longer like or where you are not growing.  Most people stay at a job for financial reasons and because the fear in moving into a new position may be too overwhelming for them and they’d rather just stay where they are.  Nothing screams “prison” like being held hostage by your lack of career choices and to stay in a job you hate no matter how valid the reason.
  2. Can I say “no” to my work?   Complete freedom comes from being able to not only walk away from a situation that is not right for you but to be able to say “no” to work that is not to your liking.  How many people do you know that have that option?  You don’t need to rebel against the hierarchy in order to be heard, but being able to professionally assert yourself is the key to true job independence.
  3. Do I have true flexibility?  Choosing whether to stay with your job is one thing but do you have the freedom to come and go as you please at work and make your own schedule?  Having creative freedom in your work projects is as important to creating job independence as your ability to walk away from your job or to show up to work when you want.

Having job independence means you are not limited by your surroundings and you can make your way at any time and under any circumstances.  If you are lucky enough to have true job freedom, than you have much to celebrate this holiday!

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

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